The First Intergovernmental Review Meeting on the Implementation of the Global Programme of Action for the Protection of the Marine Environment from Land-based Activities (GPA)

Montreal, Canada; 26 - 30 November 2001


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HIGHLIGHTS FOR WEDNESDAY, 28 NOVEMBER 2001

 

On Wednesday, delegates at the Intergovernmental Review (IGR) on Implementation of the Global Programme of Action for the Protection of the Marine Environment from Land-based Activities (GPA) discussed building partnerships and financing implementation of the GPA in a morning Plenary session. The draft Montreal Declaration, the draft Co-Chairs’ summary of the meeting, and the draft report of the meeting, to be forwarded to the high-level segment, were presented for delegates’ consideration in the afternoon.

BUILDING PARTNERSHIPS AND FINANCING IMPLEMENTATION OF THE GPA



The AFRICAN DEVELOPMENT BANK stressed the need to establish priorities, given that a proliferation of environmental agreements has led to competition for increasingly scarce financial resources. He urged the GPA to ensure that its activities are effectively integrated into national development planning processes. Left photo: Vasant Jogoo, African Development Bank

GREENPEACE INTERNATIONAL called for: full debt relief for least developed countries; fulfillment of developed countries’ commitment to 0.7 percent of GNP for ODA; removal of all environ­mentally destructive subsidies; and full implementation of the polluter pays principle.




CANADA stressed the importance of integrating public and private investments and improving access to existing resources.



The WORLD BANK affirmed its commitment to sustainable development, and noted that it has already contributed to GPA-related activities even though it has not targeted funds specifically to the GPA.




The US  (left) welcomed the focus on creating partnerships between the private sector and NGOs for implementing the GPA, and supported the promotion of environmental awareness among stakeholders as a positive strategy for mobilizing new investments.




SWEDEN stressed that building partnerships with stakeholders is key in mobilizing needed resources, and that innovative solutions for financing can be found through private-public partnerships.



Abubakar R.M.S. Rajabu (TANZANIA) (right) emphasized the need for local governments to sensitize and educate coastal communities on the dangers of polluted waters. He noted the opportunities provided by ecotourism, and highlighted the need for improved town planning, cleaner production and consumption, empowered local governments, and debt relief. 





Andrea Merla (GEF) (right) announced that it hopes to increase its support for the GPA in the areas of conservation, sustainable use of coastal resources, and protection of biodiversity.





The INTERNATIONAL OCEAN INSTITUTE flagged international taxation, such as a tourism tax, as a possible source of future financing.





NEW ZEALAND supported the phase-out of subsidies that harm the marine environment, especially agricultural subsidies.





SWITZERLAND stressed the importance of a successful GEF replenishment.





KIRIBATI urged the GPA to focus on finding financing solutions for developing countries, particularly small island States.

DRAFT MONTREAL DECLARATION

Tom Laughlin (US), Chair of the Montreal Declaration drafting group, introduced the draft Montreal Declaration on the Protection of the Marine Environment from Land-based Activities. The draft Declaration consists of six preambular paragraphs and three operative sections, on mainstreaming of the GPA, oceans and coastal governance, and financing of the GPA.




Following proposed amendments to the text from JAMAICA, MONACO, VENEZUELA (left) and SOUTH AFRICA, Co-Chair Slade (Samoa) suspended the Plenary to allow the drafting group to reconvene and address delegates� remaining concerns.

DRAFT CO-CHAIRS� SUMMARY OF THE MEETING:


Co-Chair Johannesson (Iceland) (left) informed delegates that the Co-Chairs were preparing a Co-Chairs� Summary of the meetings� discussions, which would be presented to ministers and would serve as one of the outputs of the meeting. Outlining some of its conclusions, he highlighted considerable progress in GPA implementation and in integrated coastal management and ocean governance, and noted that many countries have implemented national programmes of action (NPAs) and have integrated the GPA into their national plans.
DRAFT REPORT OF THE IGR MEETING:
Rapporteur Franklin McDonald (Jamaica) introduced the draft report of the IGR meeting (UNEP/GPA/IGR.1/L.1) and invited delegations to offer comments in writing. He explained that the report is not intended to include every statement but to capture the overall spirit of dialogue.
SD GPA SNAPSHOTS:

Photos clockwise: Exhibits representing relevant actors and stakeholders include WHO, Netherlands Pavillion, and UNILEVER Canada

Right photo: Paul Topping of Environment Canada manning the Canada's booth on NPA. For more information please visit their website at http://www.ec.gc.ca/marine/npa-pan/index.htm

Photos below: The people behind the scenes
Links
GPA Website 
GPA preparatory documents  and information for participants (pdf)
GPA IGR NEWSLETTER
CBD: Jakarta Manadate on Marine and Coastal Biodiversity

 


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