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KEY PUBLICATIONS AND ONLINE RESOURCES

FORESTS, DESERTS, LAND

This page was updated on: 01/13/10

 

2003
 

Forests, Deserts, Land Key Publications and Online Resources Archives: 2010; 2009; 2008; 2007; 2006; 2005; 2004; 2002

 

EXTRACTIVE INDUSTRIES IN ARID AND SEMI-ARID ZONES: ENVIRONMENTAL PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT

(IUCN and UNCCD, 2003) This publication, edited by Joachim Gratzfeld, offers environmental planning and management guidance on extractive industries development activities in arid and semi-arid zones. These environments include ecosystems with unique ecological and biological features that contribute to global biodiversity. They also have significant potential for mining, gas and oil extraction, which is subject to concentrated exploration and exploitation efforts. The first four chapters offer operational guidance on extractive industries development activities. Chapter 5 identifies key guiding principles that will help government officials, environmental NGOs, and executives of extractive industries to consider ecosystem conservation needs of exploration and exploitation activities in arid and semi-arid lands to promote long-term sustainable development and is organized in three sections: planning and management of natural resources; policies, laws, and institutions; and monitoring. 

 

This study was first called for by the African Group at the third Conference of the Parties to the Convention to Combat Desertification (CCD) in Recife, Brazil, in November 1999. This interest was reiterated by the members of IUCN at the second IUCN World Conservation Congress in Amman, Jordan, in October 2000, where the members approved a resolution calling on the IUCN Secretariat to prepare and adopt guidelines for oil, gas and mineral exploration and exploitation in arid and semi-arid zones. To access the book visit http://www.unccd.int/publicinfo/publications/iucn.php

 

A NEW AGENDA FOR FOREST CONSERVATION AND POVERTY REDUCTION: MAKING FOREST MARKETS WORK FOR LOW-INCOME PRODUCERS
(Forest Trends and CIFOR, 2003) This eight-chapter paper by Sara Scherr, Andy White and David Kaimowitz identifies strategies to promote forest conservation in ways that positively contribute to local livelihoods and community development in low- and middle-income countries. It discusses: market niches where large numbers of low-income producers have, or could develop, a competitive market advantage; commercial opportunities for private forest industry, forest enterprises and business service providers to partner with low-income forest producers; and alternative strategies to recognize, encourage and reward forest conservation by local forest owners and users. To contribute toward a level playing field, the authors identify roles for local people’s organizations and federations, private forest industries and investors, rural development and conservation institutions, and policymakers. The 99-page text can be accessed at: http://www.forest-trends.org/resources/pdf/A%20New%20Agenda.pdf

 

BRIDGING THE GAP: COMMUNITIES, FORESTS AND INTERNATIONAL NETWORKS
(CIFOR, September 2003) This Synthesis Report of the Project ‘Learning Lessons from International Community Forestry Networks’ was written by Marcus Colchester, Tejaswini Apte, Michel Laforge, Alois Mandondo and Neema Pathak. It compiles lessons learned from the evolution of community forestry over the past 25 years and the international networks that promote community forestry, based on a review of seven countries and ten networks. It examines advocacy effectiveness, communication techniques, network governance, relations with donors and linkages to social movements. The report is available in PDF format at: http://www.cifor.cgiar.org/publications/pdf_files/OccPapers/OP-41.pdf

 

CHINA’S FOREST POLICY: GLOBAL LESSONS FROM MARKET REFORMS
(RFF and CIFOR, September 2003) This co-publication of Resources for the Future (RFF) and the Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR) evaluates the effects of China’s forest policy as it has followed or extended from agricultural, trade and other reforms that began in 1978. Edited by William F. Hyde, Brian Belcher and Jintao Xu, the book addresses the pressures exerted by the growing economy on the forest environment, the environmental effects of extractive activities, the property rights arrangements that have fostered the most sustainable management practices and the contribution that forestry can make as an agent of development. It pays particular attention to China’s successful use of economic incentives. For more information see http://www.rff.org/rff/rff_press/bookdetail.cfm?outputid=7660

 

ACCESS, LABOR, AND WILD FLORAL GREENS MANAGEMENT IN WESTERN WASHINGTON’S FORESTS
(USDA Forest Service Pacific Northwest Research Station, July 2003) In this report, Kathryn A. Lynch and Rebecca J. McLain compare the changes that took place between 1994 and 2002 in the nontimber forest product (NTFP) management regime that governed access to floral greens and other NTFPs in western coastal Washington. The report abstract notes that the study “has several key implications for forest managers, including the need for managers and policymakers to recognize the heterogeneity of the harvester and buyer populations and to consider the possibility that interventions in domains seemingly unrelated to forest management, such as labor policy, might constitute key elements of a sustainable forest management strategy. The report ends with a list of steps managers and researchers can take to support sustainable floral greens management.” The full report is available online at: http://www.fs.fed.us/pnw/pubs/gtr585.pdf. Hard copies can be ordered through: pubrequest@srs.fs.usda.gov
 

LOCAL FOREST MANAGEMENT: THE IMPACTS OF DEVOLUTION POLICIES

(Earthscan, September 2003) This six-chapter collaboration edited by David Edmunds and Eva Wollenberg presents case studies from China, India and the Philippines to demonstrate that devolution policies increase governmental control over the management of local resources and do so at lower cost. The findings show that if local forest users are to exercise genuine control over forest management, they must be better represented in the processes of forming, implementing and evaluating devolution policies. In addition, the guiding principle for policy discussions should be to create sustainable livelihoods for local resource users rather than reducing the cost of government forest administration. For more information and to order the book see http://www.earthscan.co.uk/asp/bookdetails.asp?key=4022

 

CHANGING LANDSCAPES: THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE INTERNATIONAL TROPICAL TIMBER ORGANIZATION AND ITS INFLUENCE ON TROPICAL FOREST MANAGEMENT

(Earthscan, May 2003) Duncan Poore’s 18-chapter study reviews the evolution of policies for the sustainable use of tropical forests through a history of the International Tropical Timber Organization (ITTO). He introduces the ecological, historical and socio-economic trends that have influenced contemporary global forest management regimes and then explores political forces that have shaped the trade in tropical timber and its regulation in a session-by-session review of the ITTO’s meetings. For more information and to order the book see: http://www.earthscan.co.uk/asp/bookdetails.asp?key=3949

 

DESARROLLO E IMPLEMENTACIÓN DE LINEAMIENTOS DE CONTROL DEL LA EXTRACCIÓN ILEGAL PARA UN MANEJO FORESTAL SOSTENIBLE EN EL PERU
(ITTO, April 2003) Carlos Chirinos and Manuel Ruiz of the Peruvian Environmental Law Society, a non-governmental organization, prepared this analysis of the illegal logging and marketing of timber species in Peru on behalf of the International Tropical Timber Organization (ITTO). The report is the first in a series planned by ITTO to assist its producer countries, upon request, to devise ways to enhance forest law enforcement. The report examines the strengths and weaknesses of a Peruvian forestry law adopted in 2000 and recommends, among other things: more training for forest loggers on forest legislation and management; realistic options for granting access to production forests to small-scale loggers; regional decentralization of the decision-making process for the approval of forest harvesting permits; the establishment of an independent body responsible for the supervision of forest concessions; strengthening the implementation of punitive measures for violations of forest law; and strengthening concession management practices to promote community participation in the use of technologies that facilitate waste utilization, charcoal processing and industrialization and other actions geared to generating employment in concession management. An executive summary is available at: http://www.itto.or.jp/ittcdd_ses/download/34th/council/S-C34-15.doc (Spanish) or http://www.itto.or.jp/ittcdd_ses/download/34th/council/E-C34-15.doc (English). The full report can be obtained by contacting Collins Ahadome, ITTO Information Officer, at: itto@itto.or.jp

 

MEXICO'S COMMUNITY - MANAGED FORESTS AS A GLOBAL MODEL FOR SUSTAINABLE LANDSCAPES
(Conservation Biology, Vol. 17, Issue 3, June 2003) In this article, D. Bray, L. Merino, P. Negreros, G. Segura, J.M. Torres and H. Vester examine the Mexican experience with community forestry management. Local villages and indigenous communities own over half the country’s forest. Most of these communities have gained substantial control over the use of their forests and 300-500 community forest enterprises (CFEs) have been created and produce timber on their own lands. The authors suggest that important gains, including for biodiversity protection and forest management, result from the CFEs’ actions. An abstract is available at http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/links/doi/10.1046/j.1523-1739.2003.01639.x/abs/. Requests for a PDF version of the paper, or questions and comments for the authors should be directed to David Bray at brayd@fiu.edu

 

CPF SOURCEBOOK ON FUNDING FOR SUSTAINABLE FOREST MANAGEMENT
The Collaborative Partnership on Forests’ (CPF) electronic Sourcebook on Funding Sustainable Forest Management (SFM) helps users identify information on funding sources and the funding policies and delivery mechanisms of donor countries, international organizations, development banks, private sector entities and other relevant groups, in support of sustainable forest management in developing countries. Users are encouraged to make practical use of the knowledge contained in the Sourcebook and to enrich its content by contributing their knowledge and experience. The Sourcebook was developed by the CPF, an interagency partnership set up to support the UN Forum on Forests, with technical assistance from FAO and in collaboration with the National Forest Programme Facility. It can be accessed at: http://www.fao.org/forestry/cpf-sourcebook

 

AUSTRALIAN-PROFOR SUMMARY OF THE IPF/IFF PROPOSALS FOR ACTION
The Australian-PROFOR Summary of the IPF/IFF Proposals for Action presents the proposals for action in a consolidated format organized according to the programme elements of the UNFF’s Plan of Action. The summary also includes reference to the Convention on Biological Diversity's expanded forest biodiversity work programme. This summary is a tool that can facilitate national-level assessment of progress and priorities for action toward sustainable forest management. It was produced jointly by the Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry of Australia (AFFA) and the Program on Forests (PROFOR) at the World Bank. The summary can be accessed at: http://www.profor.info/pubs/austproforsum.htm

 

�HUMAN FOOTPRINT� AND �LAST OF THE WILD� DATASETS
SEDAC and CIESIN have compiled two datasets �to facilitate policy-making aimed at conserving the Last of the Wild.� The Human Footprint dataset contains nine global-scale layers on the following themes: human population pressure, human land use and infrastructure, and human access. The Last of the Wild dataset was created using the Human Footprint dataset. It identifies 569 wild places representing the least influenced or �wildest� areas in their respective biomes. The datasets are online and available for downloading in GIS formats. For more information or to download the datasets see: http://www.ciesin.columbia.edu/wild_areas/

 

FORESTS.ORG ENHANCES FOREST, CLIMATE AND ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY PORTALS
Forests.org has increased its original commentary and expanded web searches on its three environmental websites: the �Forest Conservation Portal� at http://forests.org/, the ClimateArk � Climate Change Portal at http://www.climateark.org/, and the Eco-Portal - Environmental Sustainability Portal at http://www.eco-portal.com/. Among the new features are �blogs,� or journals of timely web commentary, on each site (see http://www.forests.org/blog/, http://www.climateark.org/blog/ and http://www.eco-portal.com/blog/). The forest and climate search engines each tap into half a million URLs, while the Eco-Portal approaches two million URLs. In addition, Forest.org will soon unveil a �Water Conservation Portal.�

 

If you would like to submit details of
recently published documents and online resources,
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Diego Noguera, IISD

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