Go to IISD's website

IISD Reporting Services - Linkages
bringing you the latest news, information and analysis from
international environment and sustainable development negotiations

 

 Sustainable Development

 2005 review

 Biodiversity and Wildlife

 Chemicals Management

 Climate and Atmosphere

 Forests, Deserts, Land

 Human Development

 Intergovernmental Orgs

 Trade and Investment

 Water, Wetlands, Coasts

 

LINKAGES UPDATE


 Recent Meetings

  Media Reports

  Comings and Goings

  Upcoming Meetings

  Key publications and
online resources

  Links to other resources
 

  Return to Linkages Site

  IISD.org

 

 

KEY PUBLICATIONS AND ONLINE RESOURCES

CLIMATE AND ATMOSPHERE

This page was updated on: 01/12/10

 

2003

 

Climate and Atmosphere Key Publications and Online Resources Archives: 2010; 2009; 2008; 2007; 2006; 2005; 2004; 2002

 

CLIMATE CHANGE, VULNERABLE COMMUNITIES AND ADAPTATION
(IISD, December 2003) Three new information papers have been produced on the subject of climate change vulnerability and adaptation. The papers were prepared by IUCN – The World Conservation Union, the Boston Center of the Stockholm Environment Institute, and the International Institute for Sustainable Development. The papers seek to encourage the use of ecosystem management and restoration activities in climate change adaptation strategies by highlighting successful examples of where such activities have decreased community vulnerability to climate-related hazards such as droughts and floods. The reports are available online at: http://www.iisd.org/natres/security/publications.asp#ccvca

 

SINKS IN THE CDM: AFTER THE CLIMATE, BIODIVERSITY GOES DOWN THE DRAIN
(Greenpeace, December 2003) This new report from Greenpeace presents the environmental group’s perspective on the recent deal on the use of carbon “sinks” in the Clean Development Mechanism. The Clean Development, or CDM, allows industrialized countries to help meet their emissions targets under the Kyoto Protocol by assisting developing countries in reducing their emissions. At the recent climate talks held in Milan, negotiators agreed on rules for including carbon sinks, such as various forestry projects, under the CDM. However, Greenpeace’s analysis of the deal struck in Milan heavily criticizes the inclusion of carbon sinks projects in the CDM, asserting that “the door is now wide open for projects with disastrous effects for biodiversity and local livelihoods.” The full report.

 

BEYOND KYOTO: ADVANCING THE INTERNATIONAL EFFORT AGAINST GLOBAL CLIMATE CHANGE
(Pew Center on Global Climate Change, December 2003) The Pew Center has released a new report examining key issues facing negotiators seeking to secure a long-term agreement on the problem. The report starts with the premise that, whether or not the Kyoto Protocol eventually enters into force, a long-term approach must be agreed that engages all the world’s major greenhouse gas emitters, including the United States and major developing countries. The 170-page report, which consists of six “think pieces,” was prepared by a dozen authors and discussed at several workshops held in 2003. The authors explore critical issues in the climate negotiations and a range of options for addressing them. However, rather than offering definitive conclusions or recommendations, the report identifies common themes that could be considered in moving towards the “next stage” of climate diplomacy. The need for flexibility in countries’ responses to the problem is a key point made by the authors. The full report.

 

THE INTERNATIONAL CLIMATE CHANGE REGIME: A GUIDE TO RULES, INSTITUTIONS AND PROCEDURES
(Institute of Development Studies/Cambridge University Press, 2003/04) This new book by Farhana Yamin and Joanna Depledge explains the rules, institutions and procedures of the climate change regime, covering the UNFCCC, the Kyoto Protocol, and all decisions by the Conference of the Parties. While the final version of the book will not be published until 2004, copies of the advance draft are now available online at: http://www.ids.ac.uk/ids/env/climatechange.html

 

GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS FROM ANNEX I COUNTRIES
(GRID-Arendal, December 2003) Norway’s GRID-Arendal has produced two new sets of graphs charting the historical and projected emissions of greenhouse gases of developed countries. The graphs use the Kyoto target as a point of reference, and employ data from the Third National Communications collected by the UNFCCC Secretariat. Prepared in time for the ninth Conference of the Parties to the UNFCCC held in December 2003 in Milan, Italy, the graphs suggest that, while Sweden and the UK are likely to meet their Kyoto targets, many other countries are likely to over-pollute, therefore exceeding their goals. These country-by-country graphs are available online at: http://www.grida.no/climate/

 

STATE AND TRENDS OF THE CARBON MARKET
(World Bank, December 2003) This report provides an overview of the emerging carbon market, particularly in relation to the Kyoto Protocol’s Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) and joint implementation (JI) initiative. The new study suggests that the Kyoto Protocol is having a significant impact on the carbon market, even though the treaty has yet to enter into force. Based on material provided by various organizations and agencies active in the field, the report finds that the volume exchanged on the carbon market doubled over 12 months, exceeding 70 million tons of carbon dioxide equivalent in 2003. Two years ago, only 13 million tons was traded. The report outlines the growing private sector participation in the market. It also details where emission reduction projects are located, noting that much of Africa, and many smaller developing countries, are not yet benefiting from the growing trade. The report is available online at: http://prototypecarbonfund.org/router.cfm?Page=Research

 

THE CLEAN DEVELOPMENT MECHANISM (CDM) TOOLKIT: A RESOURCE FOR STAKEHOLDERS, ACTIVISTS AND NGOS
(CDM Watch, November 2003). This CDM Toolkit is designed for stakeholders, community groups, civil society organizations and non-governmental organizations that have little or no prior experience with the CDM. Produced by CDM Watch, a non-profit organization based in Indonesia, the Toolkit provides an explanation of how the CDM works, what rights it gives stakeholders, and how to assess projects. The Toolkit is now available in English, French, Indonesian, Portuguese, and Spanish, and will soon be published in Hindi. It is available online at: http://www.cdmwatch.org/cdm_toolkit.php

 

SEEING THE LIGHT: ADAPTING TO CLIMATE CHANGE WITH DECENTRALIZED RENEWABLE ENERGY IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIES
(Climate Change Knowledge Network, December 2003). This latest publication from CCKN highlights the positive contribution of decentralized renewable energy to integrated climate policy. Using case studies, the report examines how such energy projects can help build adaptive capacity. The report also contains specific recommendations for supporting such projects through the Kyoto Protocol’s Clean Development Mechanism (CDM). For more information on this report visit: http://www.cckn.net/

 

INTEGRATING MITIGATION AND ADAPTATION INTO CLIMATE AND DEVELOPMENT POLICY: THREE RESEARCH QUESTIONS
(Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research, November 2003). This research paper is one of several released in recent weeks by the Tyndall Centre in the UK. In this paper, Richard J.T. Klein, Emma Lisa Schipper and Suraje Dessai argue that, rather than actually developing and implementing specific mitigation and adaptation options, climate policy should instead aim to facilitate such development and implementation as part of sectoral policies. The latest Tyndall Centre working papers are available online at: http://www.tyndall.ac.uk/publications/working_papers/working_papers.shtml

 

IEA WORLD ENERGY INVESTMENT OUTLOOK 2003

(International Energy Agency, November 2003) This new report attempts to quantify the energy sector investment needed over the next 30 years to meet rising global energy demand. The study identifies both the amount of capital required to finance the construction of energy supply infrastructure and the obstacles that the sector must overcome in order to attract it. The study considers oil, gas, coal, electricity and renewables investments, on a region-by-region basis. For more information on this report, visit: http://www.worldenergyoutlook.org/weo/about.asp

 

US TECHNOLOGY AND INNOVATION POLICIES – LESSONS FOR CLIMATE CHANGE

(Pew Center on Global Climate Change, November 2003) This report was written by Pew Center consultant John A. Alic, David C. Mowery of the University of California, Berkeley, and Carnegie Mellon University’s Edward S. Rubin. In their report, the authors find that the US Government’s approach and policies will be critical to the development and adoption of new technologies needed to abate global warming. They argue that support for research and development by itself is not enough, and that a balanced policy portfolio that promotes the diffusion of knowledge and deployment of new technologies is essential. The report also recommends that funds to support such policies be channeled through multiple agencies and programmes, and urges that short-term political pressures should not be a factor in determining policy. More information.

 

COSTS OF INACTION: DELAYING ACTION ON GLOBAL WARMING COSTS CONSUMERS AND THE ENVIRONMENT
(US Public Interest Research Group, October 2003) The US Public Interest Research Group (PIRG) Education Fund has released a report on the costs of delaying action on climate change. The report estimates that the US suffered almost $20 billion in economic losses in 2002 due to extreme weather events, and warns that this cost could increase if action is not taken to address the problem. The report also argues that policies to combat climate change, such as support for energy and fuel efficiency and the promotion of electricity generation from renewable sources, would save consumers billions of dollars. The report is available online at: http://uspirg.org/uspirg.asp?id2=10915&id3=USPIRG&

 

REFORM OF THE EU INSTITUTIONS: IMPLICATIONS FOR THE EU'S PERFORMANCE IN CLIMATE NEGOTIATIONS
(CEPS Policy Brief No. 40, September 2003) This policy brief, written by Louise van Schaik and Christian Egenhofer, examines the potential impact of the draft Constitutional Treaty of the Convention on the Future of Europe on the EU’s performance at climate negotiations. The paper suggests that the establishment of an EU Minister of Foreign Affairs could result in greater integration of broader foreign policy considerations into the EU’s approach to climate change negotiations. The authors also assess how proposed changes to the rotating EU Presidency could affect the EU’s climate policies. The paper concludes that the draft Constitution could lead to greater consistency in the EU’s positions. The policy brief is available online at: http://shop.ceps.be/free/1060.pdf

 

PRICE-RELATED SENSITIVITIES OF GREENHOUSE GAS INTENSITY TARGETS
(Climate Policy, 2003/2004) In this article, Benito Müller and Georg Müller-Fürstenberger begin by noting that greenhouse gas intensities are an appealing tool to foster abatement without imposing constraints on economic growth. However, the authors argue that calculating intensities is difficult, as it gives rise to some significant statistical and conceptual problems relating to the inflation-proofing of GDP growth. The report argues that the choice of price index, the updating of quantity weights and the selection of base year prices can have a significant impact on the commitment of intensity targets. The report, which will feature in an upcoming issue of Climate Policy, is available online at: http://www.wolfson.ox.ac.uk/~mueller/IP1.pdf

 

KEY WORLD ENERGY STATISTICS
(International Energy Agency, September 2003) This study by the IEA presents energy data on the supply, transformation and consumption of all energy sources, as well as information on greenhouse gas emissions, and outlooks for future energy use. The report is available online at: http://www.iea.org/statist/key2003.pdf

 

CARING FOR CLIMATE – A GUIDE TO THE CLIMATE CHANGE CONVENTION AND THE KYOTO PROTOCOL
(UNFCCC, September 2003) The Climate Change Secretariat has produced a new guide to the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) and the Kyoto Protocol. The guide includes a history of the negotiations and information on the UNFCCC and Kyoto Protocol, including a description of the market mechanisms developed under the Protocol. It also contains a section on future directions. The report is available online at: http://unfccc.int/resource/cfc_guide.pdf

 

GLOBAL WARMING AND EAST ASIA
(RoutledgeCurzon, July 2003) This book, authored by Paul Harris, examines the domestic politics, foreign policy and international relations of climate change in China, Japan and Southeast Asia. Noting that the countries of East Asia are often disproportionately affected by climate change and that their contribution to the problem grows as they expand and develop, Harris addresses the forces and actors underlying policies and behavior in the region with the aim of increasing understanding of a region vital to mitigating and coping with climate change. More information.

 

KEEPING THE LIGHTS ON – WORKING PAPER NO. 2
(Royal Institute of International Affairs, September 2003) Walt Patterson of the Royal Institute has released the second in a series of four working papers examining problems and options for international electricity policy over the long-term. The working papers, which are being published under the title Keeping The Lights On, are planned as a follow-up to Patterson’s previous publication, Transforming Electricity (RIIA/Earthscan 1999). In his latest working paper, Patterson argues that there is no longer any certainty over key policy questions, including which technologies should be chosen to generate electricity, where to install new facilities, or what ownership structures should be applied. He examines technical configurations, financial arrangements, institutional frameworks and business relationships, and considers how these might evolve over time in order to manage change in the electricity sector successfully. The report.

 

THE EXPORT OF SECOND-HAND GOODS AND THE TRANSFER OF TECHNOLOGY
(Adelphi Research, May 2003) This study, commissioned by the German Council for Sustainable Development, considers the environmental impact of used machinery imported into developing countries. Authors Jörg Janischewski, Mikael P. Henzler, and Walter Kahlenborn find that the export of second hand goods is increasingly threatening the effectiveness of climate protection measures. The findings of the report are due to be presented at the annual meeting of the Council for Sustainable Development on 1 October 2003 in Berlin. The report is available online at: http://www.adelphi-research.de/projektberichte/USMD.pdf 

 

HANDBOOK ON CRITICAL USE NOMINATIONS FOR METHYL BROMIDE
(UNEP, August 2003) This online handbook describes the nomination process for exemptions for methyl bromide for “critical” uses under the Montreal Protocol. Methyl bromide was listed as a controlled substance in 1992 at the Fourth Meeting of the Parties (MOP-4) to the Montreal Protocol. However, allowance was made for a level of production and consumption of methyl bromide to continue after production phase-out where it was deemed necessary to satisfy uses agreed by the Parties to be “critical.” The handbook aims to give guidance to Parties to enable them to submit their nominations for critical use exemptions for consideration at the upcoming 15th Meeting of the Parties (MOP-15), which will take place in November 2003. The handbook.
 

ENERGY AND THE ENVIRONMENT 2003
(WIT Press, 2003) Edited by C.A. Brebbia, and I. Sakellaris, this book features most of the papers presented at the First International Conference on Sustainable Energy, Planning and Technology in Relationship to the Environment (Energy and the Environment), held in Halkidiki, Greece from 14-16 May 2003. With sections addressing energy and environment, energy resources management, energy markets and policy, renewable energy resources, alternative energy sources, energy efficiency in buildings, industrial energy issues, transportation energy reduction and losses, energy computer modeling, and data management, the book covers a range of technological and policy issues on power generation, transmission, energizing materials, energy efficiency, and waste and pollution. More information on the Energy and the Environment 2003 Conference is available at: http://www.wessex.ac.uk/conferences/2003/energy03/index.html and more information on the book can be found at: http://www.witpressusa.com/acatalog/9704.html.

 

U.S. ENERGY SCENARIOS FOR THE 21ST CENTURY
(Pew Center on Global Climate Change, July 2003) Prepared for the Pew Center by Irving Mintzer, J. Amber Leonard, and Peter Schwartz of the Global Business Network, this report considers three possible paths for U.S. energy supply and use for the next three decades, and the effect of the government’s climate policy on the three scenarios. The report argues for a mandatory constraint on carbon emissions, and warns of a likely rise in emissions without such a cap. It contends that voluntary measures will not reduce emissions, even if the carbon intensity of the economy declines. In other findings, the report also concludes that there are technologies that could help address both climate change and enhance energy security, if supported by the appropriate policies and levels investments. The report. 

 

HANDBOOK ON CRITICAL USE NOMINATIONS FOR METHYL BROMIDE
(UNEP, August 2003) This online handbook describes the nomination process for exemptions for methyl bromide for “critical” uses under the Montreal Protocol. Methyl bromide was listed as a controlled substance in 1992 at the Fourth Meeting of the Parties (MOP-4) to the Montreal Protocol. However, allowance was made for a level of production and consumption of methyl bromide to continue after production phase-out where it was deemed necessary to satisfy uses agreed by the Parties to be “critical.” The handbook aims to give guidance to Parties to enable them to submit their nominations for critical use exemptions for consideration at the upcoming 15th Meeting of the Parties (MOP-15), which will take place in November 2003. The handbook is available online at: http://www.unep.ch/ozone/MBTOC-CriticalUsesHandbook.pdf

 

CORPORATE GOVERNANCE AND CLIMATE CHANGE: MAKING THE CONNECTION
(CERES, July 2003) Commissioned by CERES and written by Douglas Cogan of the Investor Responsibility Research Center, this report looks at how 20 of the world’s largest corporate emitters of greenhouse gases are factoring climate change into their business strategies and governance practices. A “Climate Change Governance Checklist” provides an analysis of the companies’ actions in the areas of board oversight, management accountability, executive compensation, emissions reporting and material risk disclosure. The report finds that many of these companies are not adequately disclosing the financial risks posed by climate change and also are not dealing with global warming issues in other key corporate governance areas. The report describes how investors can engage companies on climate change as part of the emerging corporate governance agenda, and includes recommendations for corporate boards/executives and policymakers. More information is available at: http://ceres.org/newsroom/press/ceresirrcrel.htm

 

INDUSTRY GENIUS: INVENTIONS AND PEOPLE PROTECTING THE CLIMATE AND FRAGILE OZONE LAYER
(Greenleaf Publishing, July 2003) Authored by Stephen O. Andersen and Durwood Zaelke, this book presents the “inventive genius” of ten global companies in achieving technological breakthroughs that help protect the climate and/or the ozone layer, while contributing to the companies’ bottom line. Companies featured in this book are Alcoa, Aviation Partners, DaimlerChrysler, Energy Star, Honda, Japan's F-Center for Greenhouse Gas Alternatives, Seiko Epson, ST Microelectronics, Trane and Visteon. More information is available online at: http://www.greenleaf-publishing.com/catalogue/genius.htm

 

SCIENTIFIC FACTS ON CLIMATE CHANGE AND GLOBAL WARMING
Published by GreenFacts, this study provides the current scientific consensus on climate change, structured in three levels of increasing detail. This resource is based on IPCC’s Third Assessment Report and is available at:
http://www.greenfacts.org/studies/climate_change/index.htm

 

THE HANDBOOK FOR THE INTERNATIONAL TREATIES FOR THE PROTECTION OF THE OZONE LAYER
(UNEP, June 2003) This sixth edition of the Ozone Handbook updates readers on what’s happening in the area of international ozone protection up to the end of 2002. Divided into five main sections, the Handbook provides a detailed overview of the Ozone treaties. Section I presents the text of the Vienna Convention, and includes all the decisions adopted by the Conferences of the Parties to the Convention, organized under appropriate Articles. Section II reproduces the text of the Montreal Protocol, and provides a summary of its control measures. This section also presents all decisions of the annual Meetings of the Parties, arranged under each appropriate Article of the Protocol. The section further contains summaries of destruction procedures, essential use exemptions, the Protocol’s noncompliance procedure, financial matters and declarations of the Parties. There is also a subsection on the Multilateral Fund, which includes its terms of reference and the composition of the Executive Committee and its rules of procedure. Section III addresses the Rules of Procedure for the meetings of the Parties to both the Vienna Convention and the Montreal Protocol. Section IV provides information on the evolution of the Montreal Protocol from 1987 to date, including all the adjustments and amendments made to the original text. The final section, Section V, contains a resource guide to further information relevant to ozone protection. The Handbook is available as a CD-ROM and as a pdf file on the Ozone Secretariat’s website at: http://www.unep.org/ozone/Handbook2003.shtml

 

MAINSTREAMING ADAPTATION TO CLIMATE CHANGE IN LEAST DEVELOPED COUNTRIES
(IIED, 2003) Prepared by Saleemul Huq, Atiq Rahman, Mama Konate, Youba Sokona and Hannah Reid, this report focuses on the experiences of implementing adaptation policies in two LDC countries: Bangladesh and Mali. The report suggests that despite there being a great deal already achieved in describing and analyzing vulnerability to climate change and identifying potential adaptation options, significantly more needs to be done to mainstream adaptation within the national policymaking process. The report is available online at: http://www.iied.org/docs/climate/main_ldc_rprt.pdf

 

A STRATEGIC ASSESSMENT OF THE KYOTO-MARRAKECH SYSTEM
(RIIA Briefing Paper No.6, 2003) This briefing paper summarizes key findings on the strategic dimensions of the Kyoto Protocol and the Marrakech Accords. The paper focuses on four key elements: the “real world” economics of the Kyoto Protocol; business participation and influences; prospects for US engagement; and the framing of future commitments. The paper.

 

NEGOTIATING ENVIRONMENTAL CHANGE: NEW PERSPECTIVES FROM SOCIAL SCIENCE
(UK Global Environmental Change Programme, 2003) This book is the final output of the UK’s Global Environmental Change Programme. It presents a critical review of debates in environmental social science over the past decade in three broad areas: problems of scientific uncertainty and its role in shaping environmental decisions and policy; the development of institutional frameworks for governing environmental services and resources; and the link between production and consumption, and the environment. Copies of the book are available online at: http://www.e-elgar.co.uk/

 

CLIMATE ADAPTATION: RISK, UNCERTAINTY AND DECISION-MAKING
This report was prepared by the UK Climate Impacts Programme and the UK Environment Agency’s Centre for Risk and Forecasting. It is a guide for decision-makers addressing climate risk and uncertainty. For copies of the report: http://www.environment-agency.gov.uk/business/488333/?version=1

 

GLOBAL ENVIRONMENTAL CHANGE AND LAND USE

(Kluwer Academic Publishers, 2003) Edited by A.J. Dolman, A. Verhagen, and C.A. Rovers, this book illustrates a significant dimension of global change – the interaction of land use and the climate system. The book addresses modeling of land-use patterns, the effects on climate, the effect of land use on the global carbon cycle, hydrological aspects of land use, aspects of climate change on food availability in West Africa, and the spatial requirements of bioenergy plantations. More information is available online at: http://www.wkap.nl/prod/b/1-4020-1346-9

 

AN OVERVIEW OF CARBON TRANSACTIONS: GENERAL CHARACTERISTICS AND SPECIFIC PECULIARITIES
(ECN Beleidsstudies 2003) Written by H.C. de Coninck and N.H. van der Linden, this report provides an overview of carbon trading projects. It concludes that projects under the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) have a preference for large-scale hydro, gas capture and fuel switch projects, each constituting approximately 25% of the total CDM emission reductions. For Joint Implementation (JI), the project type was found to be more diverse, and somewhat biased towards energy efficiency-type projects. Other emissions trading systems, on a country level or in a company, are also briefly reviewed. The report finds that only a small fraction of the total greenhouse gas abatement potential for CDM and JI projects has been realized thus far, and notes that this situation is likely to change after the Kyoto Protocol enters into force and Annex B countries feel the obligation to meet their Kyoto targets. The paper can be downloaded at: http://www.ecn.nl/library/reports/2003/c03022.html

 

FORESTS AND GLOBAL CLIMATE CHANGE: POTENTIAL IMPACTS ON US FOREST RESOURCES

(Pew Center on Global Climate Change, 2003) Written by H. Shugart, R. Sedjo., and B. Sohngen, this report explores the potential effects of climate change on both natural and managed forest ecosystems. For copies of the report, visit: http://www.pewclimate.org/

 

IMPLEMENTING THE KYOTO PROTOCOL WITHOUT THE UNITED STATES: THE STRATEGIC ROLE OF ENERGY TAX ADJUSTMENTS AT THE BORDER

(The Global Governance Project, 2003) Written by Frank Biermann and Rainer Brohm, this working paper analyzes possible options for the European Union to react to the non-participation of the US in the Kyoto Protocol. For copies of the paper, visit: http://www.glogov.org/workingpapers/index.html

 

THE INVESTMENT CLIMATE FOR CLIMATE INVESTMENT – JOINT IMPLEMENTATION IN TRANSITION COUNTRIES

(European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, 2003) Written by Samuel Fankhauser and Lucia Lavric, this working paper addresses the capacity of transition countries to process JI projects, as well as the business environment the countries offer to foreign investors, for example, in terms of their political and economic stability and the functioning of their legal and regulatory systems. The paper is available online at: http://www.ebrd.com/pubs/econ/workingp/77.pdf

 

TIEMPO – GLOBAL WARMING AND THE THIRD WORLD

Issue 46 of Tiempo – Global Warming and the Third World is now online featuring news and comment on the climate negotiations, reports from the World Summit on Sustainable Development, and articles on carbon sinks, erosion and reef islands. Tiempo is available online at: http://www.cru.uea.ac.uk/tiempo/floor0/recent/

 

SKY IS NOT THE LIMIT – THE EMERGING MARKET IN GREENHOUSE GASES

(Transnational Institute, January 2003) This recent briefing report warns that the emerging emissions market will result in inequitable rights to the atmosphere through prioritisation of a technocratic and corporate agenda over human rights, public participation, community survival and ecological integrity. The study argues that under the emissions trading scheme the problem of global greenhouse gas emissions is not alleviated, but instead allows countries to continue polluting the global atmosphere. The report concludes that emissions-trading is likely to undermine the Kyoto process. This report is available online at: http://www.tni.org/reports/ctw/sky.htm

 

If you would like to submit details of
recently published documents and online resources,
send a message to
Diego Noguera, IISD

up to top