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KEY PUBLICATIONS AND ONLINE RESOURCES

CHEMICALS AND WASTE MANAGEMENT

This page was updated on: 12/09/10

 

2010

 

Chemicals and Waste Management Key Publications and Online Resources Archives: 2009; 2008; 2007

 

Latest New Publications and Resources

Environmental Consequences of Ocean Acidification

Waste and Climate Change: Global Trends and Strategy Framework

 

Environmental Consequences of Ocean Acidification

(UNEP and GEF, 2010)

The report details how rising CO2 emissions are altering the chemical balance of our oceans and outlines the wide-ranging consequences of this emerging issue on marine food chains and ecosystems as well as human activities such as tourism and fishing. It also analyzes the effects of ocean acidification on global food security. [The report]

 

Waste and Climate Change: Global Trends and Strategy Framework

(UNEP, 2010)

The report estimates the emissions contribution of the waste sector at roughly 3-5%, but notes that reliability of calculation methods and data between countries vary, and concludes that the waste sector is well placed to cut its contribution to global man-made greenhouse gas emissions. [The report]

 

Protecting Arctic Biodiversity: Strengths and Limitations of Environmental Agreements

(UNEP GRID-ARENDAL, October 2010)

This report, released during the 10th meeting of the Conference of the Parties (COP 10) to the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD), details solutions to the current biodiversity crisis in the Arctic, but it stresses that conservation gains are only possible if root causes for biodiversity loss are addressed outside the Arctic.trans It finds that existing multilateral environmental agreements that include the Arctic region, such as the Kyoto Protocol and the Basel Convention on Transboundary Movement of Hazardous Wastes, may be effective against threats caused by local, national or regional activities (mining and oil and gas exploitation, for example) if implemented adequately, because threats such as climate change, transboundary contaminants and habitat fragmentation are global in nature. Among its recommendations, the report stresses that: more global, cross-sectoral and interdisciplinary thinking by policy-makers, scientists and other stakeholders will be necessary to deal with increasing pressures on Arctic biodiversity; the Arctic Council could play a more active role in supporting the development of specific conservation efforts and further collaboration with non-Arctic states that share responsibility for migratory Arctic wildlife; strengthening existing mechanisms for the protection and conservation of biodiversity, through the implementation of existing mechanisms, is necessary; harmonization of national reporting between the Arctic nations on issues of common concern would allow for more effective national reporting to multilateral environmental agreements; Arctic nations should substantially increase the extent of protected areas, especially in coastal zones and in the marine environment; and Arctic nations should invest in co-management regimes and programmes of adaptation for societies in the Arctic, drawing on their traditional knowledge. [The report]

 

Environmental Goods and Services Negotiations at the WTO: Lessons from multilateral environmental agreements and ecolabels for breaking the impasse

(IISD, 2010)

This paper by Aaron Cosbey, Soledad Aguilar, Melanie Ashton and Stefano Ponte looks for paths to progress in the WTO’s stalled negotiations on environmental goods and services – a set of talks that is frequently cited as trade policy's natural contribution to climate change objectives. It surveys the experience of a number of multilateral environmental agreements – the Rotterdam Convention (Prior Informed Consent or PIC), the Stockholm Convention (Persistent Organic Pollutants or POPs) and the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora – and ecolabels (looking at coffee, fisheries and the Energy Star label) for lessons that could be of aid in WTO negotiations. [The paper]

 

Stockholm Convention: Technical Assistance Newsletter

(Stockholm Convention, June 2010)

The Stockholm Convention Secretariat has released the first issue of its newsletter on technical assistance. This newsletter provides information on the ongoing activities in the area of technical assistance and capacity-building, activities carried out by the Secretariat and upcoming meetings. [The newsletter]

 

AFFORDABLE TRANSPORTATION AND SAFER USE OF CHEMICALS

(UNDESA, May 2010)

This monthly newsletter of the UN Department of Economic and Social Affairs (DESA) features an article on the role of affordable transport in achieving sustainable development and the Millennium Development Goals (MGDs). The article notes that over one billion people living in rural areas in developing countries lack access to adequate transportation, an essential precondition for development due to its importance for accessing markets, employment, education and basic services. It also underscores that globally increased urbanization and motorization over the past several decades have resulted in an unprecedented rise in emissions, leading to degradation in living conditions worldwide and accelerating climate change. It mentions large- and small-scale transport infrastructure success stories in India and Sri Lanka. The article.

 

METAL STOCKS IN SOCIETY: SCIENTIFIC SYNTHESIS

(UNEP, 2010)

This report, by the International Panel for Sustainable Resource Management, hosted by UNEP, focuses on the stocks of metals in society and the recycling rates. It provides information on the quantity of metal stocks in the world. The resource.

 

COMMUNITIES IN PERIL: ASIAN REGIONAL REPORT ON COMMUNITY MONITORING OF SEVERELY HAZARDOUS PESTICIDE USE

(Pesticide Action Network UK, 2010)

This report details the results of a community monitoring study aimed at investigating the use and impacts of pesticides in affected communities in Asia, and observance of the International Code of Conduct on the Distribution and Use of Pesticides. The resource.

 

RECYCLING - FROM E-WASTE TO RESOURCES

(UNEP, 2009)

This study includes: an analysis of the market potential of relevant technologies for the e-waste recycling sector in selected developing countries; examination of the application of the “Framework for UNEP Technology Transfer Activities in Support of Global Climate Change Objectives,” in order to foster the transfer of innovative technologies in the e-waste recycling sector; and identification of innovation hubs and centres of excellence in emerging economies relevant for e-waste recycling technologies. The resource.

 

PERFLUOROOCTANE SULFONATE (PFOS) PRODUCTION AND USE: PAST AND CURRENT EVIDENCE

(UNIDO, 2009)

In May 2009, PFOS was added to Annex B of the Stockholm Convention and classified as a Persistent Organic Pollutant (POP). This paper collects all of the publicly available information on PFOS production and its uses. It aims to show patterns in these areas, both by country and by sector of use, to present a complete and clear picture from the multiple studies that have been published on PFOS. The resource.

ENVIRONMENTAL STRATEGIES TO REPLACE DDT AND CONTROL MALARIA
(Pestizid Aktions-Netzwerk, 2009)

This publication from Pestizid Aktions-Netzwerk (PAN) Germany sets out the importance of situation-specific analysis in order to develop a holistic strategy of interventions that will be appropriate to the vectors and the local conditions. The study presents examples of successful interventions to control malaria that do not depend on pesticides. The
resource.


If you would like to submit details of
recently published documents and online resources,
send a message to
Diego Noguera, IISD

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