LINKAGES UPDATE - an e-update of new additions to IISD’s Linkages website - 1 July 2004

RECENT MEETINGS COVERED BY THE EARTH NEGOTIATIONS BULLETIN



L-R: SBSTA Coordinator Dennis Tirpak being congratulated by SBSTA Chair Abdullatif Benrageb on his retirement; UNFCCC Executive Secretary Joke Waller-Hunter and Hannah Hoffmann (UNFCCC).

CLIMATE SESSION TACKLES TECHNICAL MATTERS

16-25 June 2004 | Bonn, Germany

Delegates have negotiated conclusions and decisions on a range of technical issues at the latest meeting of the climate change convention’s subsidiary bodies. The twentieth sessions of the Subsidiary Bodies to the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) – which was held in Bonn, Germany, from 16-25 June 2004 – dealt with a wide range of agenda items. The Subsidiary Body for Scientific and Technological Advice addressed topics ranging from the rules governing small-scale afforestation and reforestation project activities under the Kyoto Protocol’s Clean Development Mechanism, to guidance on land use and forestry issues. Meanwhile, the Subsidiary Body for Implementation dealt with topics such as capacity building, assistance provided by the Global Environment Facility, and various administrative and financial matters.

While the meeting was generally a low-key affair, several new innovations and some increased technical complexities emerged in the process. Delegates will now be looking ahead to the UNFCCC’s tenth Conference of the Parties in December 2004, and to news of Russia’s intentions towards the Kyoto Protocol. The Earth Negotiations Bulletin reportof the meeting.

 

UNEP INTERGOVERNMENTAL WORKING GROUP BEGINS DISCUSSIONS ON STRATEGIC PLAN FOR TECHNOLOGY SUPPORT AND CAPACITY BUILDING
25 June 2004 | UN headquarters, New York
The aim of the first session of UNEP’s High-level Open-ended Intergovernmental Working Group on an Intergovernmental Strategic Plan for Technology Support and Capacity Building (ISP) was to reach agreement on how the Working Group would proceed, and to engage in an initial exchange of views as input towards the preparation of the ISP. Governments and other stakeholders provided recommendations for consideration, with a number of speakers noting that the strategic plan should be action-oriented, take a long-term strategic approach, and be consistent with the Millennium Development Goals and the Johannesburg Plan of Implementation. The ENB report.
 

OTHER RECENT MEETINGS


CORPORATE LEADERS PLEDGE TO ADDRESS CORRUPTION
24 June 2004 | UN headquarters, New York
Over 400 corporate executives, government officials and civil society leaders gathered at UN Headquarters recently for the Global Compact Leaders Summit. Participants adopted a statement that “business should work against corruption in all its forms, including extortion and bribery,” thus adding a 10th principle on corruption to the previous nine principles of the Global Compact.

Several NGOs have criticized the Compact, noting that its non-binding nature allows corporations to sign on without having to respect its principles. Prior to the Summit, the UN announced its plans to integrate the principles of the Compact into its own internal operations. More.
 


UNCTAD DEBATES GLOBALIZATION, DEVELOPMENT
13-17 June 2004 | São Paulo, Brazil
The needs of developing countries in a globalizing world were the focus of the 11th ministerial meeting of the UN Conference on Trade and Development. UNCTAD XI concluded with agreement on the “Spirit of São Paulo” declaration, which considered issues of globalization, trade and development.

This meeting was shadowed by a parallel meeting of civil society organizations, which issued a Forum Declaration with recommendations forwarded to UNCTAD XI and a resolution on “Civil Society, Corporate Globalization and the role of UNCTAD.” More.

WEST AFRICAN LEADERS EXPRESS CAUTIOUS SUPPORT FOR BIOTECH
21-23 June 2004 | Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso
A
recent Ministerial Conference on “Harnessing Science and Technology to Increase Agricultural Productivity in Africa: West African Perspectives” saw the participation of the Presidents of Burkina Faso, Mali, Niger and Ghana. During the event, the four West African Presidents signalled their support for GM crops in solving food production problems, but added that they wished to ensure consumer safety and would proceed cautiously. More.
 

BIOTECHNOLOGY INDUSTRY MEETS AMIDST PROTESTS
6-9 June 2004 | San Francisco, US
The recent Annual International Convention of the Biotechnology Industry Organization (BIO 2004) was attended by more than 16,000 representatives from 61 countries. These participants were met with hundreds of activists who gathered to protest biotechnology and corporate power. More.

STATE PARTIES TO UNCLOS MEET TO REVIEW PROGRESS
14-18 June 2004 | UN Headquarters, New York
Delegates to the 14th Meeting of States Parties to the 1982 United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea met recently to review progress in the Convention bodies, including consideration of the International Seabed Authority, the Commission on the Limits of the Continental Shelf, and the Report of the External Auditors for 2002. More.

BALTIC SEA LEADERS SHOW INTEREST IN DEVELOPING AREA AS “ECO-REGION”
21 June 2004 | Laulasmaa, Estonia
Heads of government and representatives of the Baltic States met recently to discuss, inter alia, the future of Baltic Sea regional cooperation. The meeting considered a report by Baltic 21 – a multistakeholder advisory forum – on regional progress toward sustainable development, and expressed interest in Baltic 21’s proposal to develop the region as an “Eco-region, where eco stands for both economy and ecology and where the social dimension is strongly integrated.” More.
 

AFRICAN EXPERT MEETING ON SUSTAINABLE CONSUMPTION AND PRODUCTION SENDS STATEMENT TO AMCEN
17 – 20 May 2004 | Casablanca, Morocco
Participants to the First African Expert Meeting on Sustainable Consumption and Production agreed on the Casablanca Statement on Sustainable Consumption and Production, submitting it to the 10th session of the African Ministerial Conference on the Environment (AMCEN) held from 26-30 June 2004. More.
 

COMPANIES FACE UP TO CLIMATE THREAT
2-4 June 2004 | Rüschlikon, Switzerland
Senior businesspeople have been tackling the economic and business implications of climate change. An Executive Roundtable on the Economic Dimension of Climate Change brought together more than 100 executives and other stakeholders to look at the impact different climate scenarios could have on businesses. More.

AFRICA REVIEWS IMPLEMENTATION OF ICPD, RENEWS COMMITMENT TO POPULATION ISSUES
7-11 June 2004 | Dakar, Senegal
Ministers and population experts of African nations met recently in Dakar, Senegal, to examine the problems and constraints inhibiting the implementation of the Programme of Action of the International Conference on Population and Development and adopted a blueprint report and a declaration reaffirming their strong commitment to ICPD PoA, underscoring that the Millennium Development Goals cannot be achieved without the full implementation of the Cairo programme. More.

FUNDING SHORTFALL STALLS PARTNERSHIP INITIATIVE FOR CONGO BASIN FORESTS
25-26 June 2004 | Brazzaville, Congo
The Conference of Ministers in Charge of Central African Forests (COMIFAC) is recognized as the central policy- and decision-making body for the conservation and sustainable management of forests in Central Africa. At a COMIFAC meeting held in Paris in January 2003, donors pledged US$300 million for a regional forestry strategy and agreed to meet in Brazzaville within three months. The Brazzaville meeting finally took place in June 2004, but failed to establish a mechanism to fund an estimated $US 1.5 billion over the next 10 years. More.
 

WSIS PREPCOM SEES BROAD AGREEMENT ON ISSUES FOR TUNIS PHASE
24-26 June 2004 | Hammamet, Tunisia
PrepCom 1 of the Tunis phase of the World Summit on the Information Society (WSIS) concluded with a broad agreement on the issues that will form the basis of discussions at the Tunis Summit and agreed on the structure for the preparatory process for the second phase of the WSIS. More.

LABOR CONFERENCE APPROVES PLAN OF ACTION FOR DEVELOPING MIGRANT WORKER TREATY
1-17 June 2004 | Geneva, Switzerland
The recent 92nd session of the International Labour Conference concluded with the approval of a plan of action aimed at ensuring that international labor standards extend to migrant workers. The plan calls for the development of a non-binding multilateral framework for a rights-based approach to labor migration, thus paving the way for a treaty on migrant workers to be presented to ILO member States in November 2005. More.
 

LINKAGES UPDATE


Linkages Update is our means of keeping you informed of what’s new on IISD Reporting Services' Linkages website. This page is updated on a fortnightly basis, while the website continually posts new information provided by our contributing writers. If you wish to submit relevant materials or subscribe to Linkages Update, e-mail prisna@iisd.org.

Linkages provides updates on:
Recent meetings
Upcoming meetings
Media reports
Key publications, online resource
Comings and goings

Click here for the online version and archives of Linkages Update.
 

COMINGS AND GOINGS


Appointments

IISD ANNOUNCES NEW BOARD MEMBERS
The International Institute for Sustainable Development has announced the appointment of seven new members to its board of directors. More.

Vacancies

SCIDEV.NET SEEKS WEB PRODUCTION EDITOR
London; 7 July 2004.

IISD SEEKS INTERN
Six month internship with the World Bank Group Grants Facility for Indigenous Peoples Division; Washington, DC; 6 July 2004.

CLIMATE SECRETARIAT SEEKS PROGRAMME OFFICERS
UNFCCC Secretariat seeks Programme Officers for its Sustainable Development (9 July) and Methods, Inventories and Sciences programmes (5 July); Bonn, Germany.

Click here for complete postings on appointments, departures and vacancies.

 

UN 2005 MAJOR REVIEW


UN STEPS UP FOCUS ON MDGS
From Brazil to Puerto Rico, Athens to Equatorial Guinea, one can scarcely hear a speech given by UN representatives without hearing mention of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). Comprising eight goals, 18 targets and over 40 indicators, the MDGs made their first public appearance in September 2001 in a Secretary-General’s report entitled the Road Map towards the Implementation of the UN Millennium Declaration (A/56/26), where they were formulated by members of the UN Secretariat and others to help focus national and international development priority-setting.

With 2005 marking a major UN review event and the fifth anniversary of the UN Millennium Summit, where world leaders adopted a number of development goals and commitments contained within the Millennium Declaration, the UN system has stepped up its efforts to promote the MDGs across the globe. More.

UNDP ADMINISTRATOR MARKS 2005 AS A TURNING POINT FOR DEVELOPMENT
2005 represents the last chance to make the course corrections to get on track for the MDGs, said UNDP Administrator Mark Malloch Brown during a recent press briefing. He underscored the need to further involve the private sector in meeting the MDGs, noting that the level of investment needed to this end was beyond the capacities of the public sector alone. He also said UN reform was currently not sufficient, that its agenda was too driven by “an opportunistic search for donor resources wherever they could be found,” and that it was inadequate in delivering on its two critical roles at the country level: providing technical assistance and capacity building, and advocating key issues like health or children. More.

NATIONAL FOCUS ON MDGS
Brazilian Company Spreads UN Principles through Grocery Bags, 28 June 2004
National Report Outlines Thailand’s New Development Targets; “MDG Plus” ratchets up ambitions, 23 June 2004
Lebanon makes progress toward MDGs, 23 June 2004

Key publication

MILLENNIUM PROJECT TASK FORCE INTERIM SUMMARY REPORT ON WATER AND SANITATION
The Millennium Project’s Task Force 7 on Water and Sanitation has released its interim report. An independent advisory body to the UN Secretary-General, the Millennium Project has been tasked with the responsibility of recommending by June 2005 operational strategies for meeting the MDGs. This interim report examines how the world can work together to meet Target 10 of the MDGs on halving by 2015 the proportion of people without sustainable access to safe drinking water, and the WSSD target on halving by 2015 the proportion of people without access to basic sanitation. The report is being circulated for public discussion and comments, and will result in a Final Task Force report, due at the end of 2004, which will provide input to the Millennium Project’s Final Synthesis Report, to be submitted to the Secretary-General by 30 June 2005.
More.
 

MEDIA REPORTS


G-77 COMMEMORATES 40TH ANNIVERSARY
The Group of 77 commemorated its 40th anniversary with a two day Ministerial Meeting held from 11-12 June 2004 in Sao Paulo prior to UNCTAD XI. The meeting concluded with the adoption of a Ministerial Declaration reaffirming the group’s aspirations and solidarity, and addressing the key issues of major concern to developing countries. More.

CONVENTION ON MIGRATORY SPECIES CELEBRATES 25TH ANNIVERSARY
The Convention on Migratory Species (CMS) celebrated its 25 Anniversary on 23 June 2004. More.

UNCCD TURNS 10 ON WORLD DAY TO COMBAT DESERTIFICATION
On 17 June 2004, the UN Convention to Combat Desertification celebrated its 10th anniversary. More.

UNEP PARTNERS WITH BAYER TO INVOLVE YOUTH IN ENVIRONMENT ISSUES
German-based chemicals and healthcare company Bayer AG has agreed to support UNEP’s strategy to involve youth in environment issues through a €1 million-a-year partnership. More.

UNU LAUNCHES INSTITUTE FOR ENVIRONMENT AND HUMAN SECURITY
The United Nations University recently opened its Institute for Environment and Human Security with the aim of enhancing the capacity of governments to respond to disasters. More.

AFRICAN AGRICULTURAL TECHNOLOGY FOUNDATION ENTERS NEW PHASE
14 June 2004 marked the official opening of the Nairobi-based African Agricultural Technology Foundation (AATF). More.

 


PLANT DIVERSITY TREATY ENTERS INTO FORCE
The International Treaty on Plant Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture entered into force on 29 June 2004, 90 days after the deposit of its 40th ratification. More.

ENVIRONMENT FACE-OFF:
TÖPFER VS. LOMBORG

Two environmental heavyweights sparred against each other recently over the hot issue of climate change. More.

TRADE TALKS GOING DOWN TO THE WIRE
The success of talks to kick-start the Doha round of trade negotiations remains in doubt as the late-July deadline approaches. More.

OPEN LETTER TO FAO CHIEF CRITICIZES FAO REPORT AS BIASED TOWARDS BIOTECH BUSINESS
More than 650 civil society organizations and 800 individuals from over 80 countries signed and delivered an open letter to FAO Director General Jacques Diouf criticizing the FAO report “Agricultural biotechnology: meeting the needs of the poor?” More.

RAMSAR WETLAND CONSERVATION AWARDS 2005
The Ramsar Convention on Wetlands is calling for nominations for the 2005 Ramsar Wetland Conservation Awards. More.

FOUNDATION ANNOUNCES AWARDS FOR BIODIVERSITY RESEARCH AND CONSERVATION PROJECTS
The BBVA Foundation, based in Spain, has announced that it will award five prizes, worth €1,000,000 in total, for work and research on biodiversity conservation. More.


WORLD BANK REJECTS ANTI-OIL APPROACH
The World Bank has rejected calls to end its funding of oil and gas projects. More.

OIL BOSS ADMITS CLIMATE FEARS, SHAREHOLDERS CALL FOR MORE ACCOUNTABILITY
The head of oil multinational Shell has voiced his fears that climate change could cause unprecedented damage to humanity. Environmental groups applauded the comments acknowledging climate change as a major threat. Meanwhile, Shell’s shareholders are raising calls for more accountability at the company’s twin Annual General Meetings. More.

OZONE-FRIENDLY INHALERS RAISE HEALTH FEARS
Calls to replace environmentally-harmful asthma inhalers have raised health fears in the United States, and some fear that the higher prices of the new inhalers could, quite literally, leave some asthma sufferers gasping. More.

WB GRANTS LOAN TO IMPROVE WATER QUALITY OF SOUTH CHINA SEA
The World Bank has approved a US$128 million loan and US$10 million grant to China for a project aimed at protecting the Pearl River delta and South China Sea. More.

CHINA’S PANDA POPULATION LARGER THAN ESTIMATED, AUSTRALIA’S KOALAS IN DANGER
Chinese officials announced that the wild panda population, currently at a count of 1,590, has increased by over 40 percent. Meanwhile, the Australian Koala Foundation has asked the Australian government to declare the koala a "vulnerable" species. More.

KEY PUBLICATIONS AND ONLINE RESOURCES


Sustainable development


WE THE PEOPLES: CIVIL SOCIETY, THE UNITED NATIONS AND GLOBAL GOVERNANCE
(June 2004, UN General Assembly) This review of the relationship between the United Nations and civil society was prepared by the Panel of Eminent Persons on United Nations–Civil Society Relations appointed by Kofi Annan in February 2003 and chaired by Fernando Henrique Cardoso, former president of Brazil. The Panel stresses that “constructively engaging with civil society is a necessity for the United Nations, not an option.” Proposals include calls for: the General Assembly to include civil society organizations more regularly in its affairs and the use of public hearings, involving the full range of relevant constituencies, to review progress on agreed global goals; more systematic UN investment in convening and incubating multistakeholder partnerships; levelling the playing field between civil society organizations from the North and South; deepening the dialogue between the Security Council and civil society organizations; and joining all accreditation processes into a single mechanism under the authority of the General Assembly. Other links: UN Press Briefing by Cardoso; UN Wire storyon release of the report, 22 June 2004.

UN GLOBAL COMPACT BOOKS (June 2004, Greenleaf Books)
Learning to Talk: Corporate Citizenship and the Development of the UN Global Compact: Edited by Malcolm McIntosh, Sandra Waddock and Georg Kell, with a foreword by Kofi Annan, this book reflects on the Global Compact’s aims and origins, offers some stories of engagement, and discusses how this initiative has become a reference point in the dialogue on global and corporate governance. The authors of the book’s 27 chapters range from academics to industry representatives, all seeking to take stock of some element of the Compact’s first few years.

Raising the Bar: Creating Value with the UN Global Compact: Edited by Claude Fussler, Aron Cramer, and Sebastian van der Vegt, this book provides a performance model grounded on the total quality management approach to assist businesses in putting the UN Global Compact into practice. Its 14 chapters collect and categorize corporate responsibility tools, good practice and case studies.

REALIZING THE PROMISE AND POTENTIAL OF AFRICAN AGRICULTURE: SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY STRATEGIES FOR IMPROVING AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTIVITY AND FOOD SECURITY IN AFRICA
(InterAcademy Council, June 2004) Launched recently at UN headquarters, this report underscores the need for comprehensive strategies across Africa to use science and technology in ways that boost agricultural production and ensure food security for all Africans. Prepared by the InterAcademy Council, this report was compiled in response to a request by UN Secretary-General Kofi Annan to identify how best to realize the promise and potential of agriculture in Africa. The report provides an overview of food security in Africa and a perspective of African agricultural production systems and productivity. It outlines potential science and technology options, and addresses the need to enhance impact-oriented research, knowledge and development institutions, and to create and retain a new generation of agricultural scientists.

AFRICA NETWORKING: DEVELOPMENT INFORMATION, ICTS AND GOVERNANCE
(ECA and International Books, June 2004) This 272-page publication examines the relationship between good governance and development information, analyzing the potential benefits of improved technology in Africa’s development. It highlights the role that geo-information and ICT can play in effectively delivering services by governments and agencies. This publication seeks to contribute to preparations for the African Development Forum (ADF), which will be held from 11-15 October 2004 in Addis Ababa on the theme “Governance for a progressing Africa.”

GUNS OR GROWTH? ASSESSING THE IMPACT OF ARMS SALES ON SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT
(June 2004, Amnesty International, Oxfam, and IANSA) This report by Amnesty International, Oxfam and IANSA notes that “to protect the social and economic rights of people in developing countries, it is imperative that exporting governments apply an effective and systematic methodology to assess whether proposed arms transfers will affect sustainable development.” It goes on to suggest that three levels of analysis are necessary to develop an assessment methodology: arms sales of possible concern should be identified using triggers, such as “questions that consider the significance of the financial value of the transfer and/or arms deal, in combination with a consideration of the development situation of the importer country”; the development and human security status of importing countries should be mapped using indicators; and deeper context and deal-specific questions should be raised of arms procurement processes to make an arms-export judgment against key factors, including responsible governance, import rationale and importer capacity.

Social development

INVESTING IN PEOPLE: NATIONAL PROGRESS IN IMPLEMENTING THE ICPD PROGRAMME OF ACTION 1994-2004
(UNFPA, June 2004) This publication reflects the findings of a global survey of steps undertaken by 169 countries to implement the Programme of Action that was produced at the 1994 Cairo International Conference on Population and Development (ICPD), including measures related to population and development, gender equality, women’s empowerment, reproductive rights and health and HIV/AIDS. Seventy-nine percent of reporting countries indicated that they had adopted multiple measures to integrate population concerns into development strategies and half of the countries reported taking strong action to address the issue of population and environment. The report finds that over 90 percent of countries have integrated family planning and safe motherhood into their primary healthcare systems, and that almost all countries reported that they have adopted measures to protect the rights of women and girls. A lack of financial resources was identified as the greatest impediment to progress with the survey indicating that current financial commitments by donor countries are inadequate to meeting the Cairo commitments. Several donor countries reported that they are using the MDGs as a basis for the development of programmes and policies that promote the ICPD agenda.

Biodiversity and wildlife

NEW CMS WEBSITE
The Convention on Migratory Species has launched a new website. 

CONSERVING CETACEANS: THE CONVENTION ON MIGRATORY SPECIES AND ITS RELEVANT AGREEMENTS FOR CETACEAN CONSERVATION
(CMS et al, June 2004) The Convention on Migratory Species (CMS), together with the Whale and Dolphin Conservation Society (WDCS), the Agreement on the Conservation of Small Cetaceans of the Baltic and North Seas (ASCOBANS) and the Agreement on the Conservation of Cetaceans of the Black Sea, Mediterranean Sea and Contiguous Atlantic Area (ACCOBAMS), has released this 24-page brochure on cetacean conservation. In addition to providing basic information on cetaceans, the brochure also contains species profiles highlighting the status, threats, biology and migration habits of various cetacean species, and the efforts of the Convention, its Regional Agreements and WDCS to protect them.

COMMUNICATING BIODIVERSITY
This discussion paper is part of a Royal Society for the Protection of Birds project that aims to explore different approaches and ideas in communication biodiversity. Co-sponsored by UNEP-World Conservation Monitoring Centre and prepared by Tim Kitchin, Glasshouse Partnership, this paper draws on experience from the private sector on strategic branding. The paper is open for comments.


Water, wetlands, oceans, coasts

RESPONSIBLE GROWTH FOR THE NEW MILLENNIUM
(World Bank, September 2004) This new World Bank report presents a "vision of a responsible approach to an equitable world" by 2050, addressing issues such as sustainable growth in consumption, healthfulness, human capital, environmental quality and social equity. It identifies three issues critical to preventing a world characterized by uncertainty, social unrest and environmental degradation: addressing near-term poverty and inequality; improving governance and capacity in developing countries; and investing in technological public goods, especially agricultural technologies for the tropics and treatments for infectious diseases.

RAMSAR CONVENTION HANDBOOKS FOR THE CONSERVATION AND WISE USE OF WETLANDS, 2ND EDITION
(Ramsar Convention Secretariat, 2004) The Ramsar Convention Secretariat has prepared a series of 14 handbooks on the conservation and wise use of wetlands, including several on the guidelines adopted at Ramsar COP-7 and COP-8. Aimed at assisting those with an interest in, or who are directly involved with, the implementation of the Convention at the international, regional, national and local levels, the handbooks also include relevant material from various sources and from case studies that illustrate key aspects of the guidelines.

LEGAL RESOURCES FOR THE RIGHT TO WATER: INTERNATIONAL AND NATIONAL STANDARDS
(Centre on Housing Rights and Evictions (COHRE), 2004) Prepared by COHRE’s Right to Water Programme, this publication provides a guide to international and national legal provisions and case law that give effect to the right to water. It surveys international and regional treaties and declarations on human rights, armed conflict, environment and development as well as national Constitutions, legislation and court judgments. The guide demonstrates the basis for the right to water in international law and the manner in which this right has been implemented in several national legal systems. The guide also provides a commentary on the implications of these standards and on means to implement legal standards on the right to water.

WWF AND RSPB RELEASE STUDY ON GLOBAL MPA COSTS
(WWF and RSPB, June 2004) WWF and the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds (RSPB) have published a new study evaluating the costs and benefits of establishing a global network of marine protected areas (MPAs). According to the report, published in the National Academy of Science’s journal, developing a MPA network for 30% of the world’s oceans would cost US$12-14 billion a year, but that such a network would help safeguard a global fish catch worth up to US$80 billion, ensure the sustained delivery of marine ecosystem services worth an estimated US $7,000 billion each year, and generate between 830,000 and 1.1 million full-time jobs. Commitments for establishing representative networks of MPAs by 2012 were made by governments at the WSSD.

RIVERS AT RISK: DAMS AND THE FUTURE OF FRESHWATER ECOSYSTEMS
(WWF, 2004) This WWF report outlines the implications of dam-building on the world’s largest rivers, analyzing the construction and planning of dams on a river basin scale and examines the risks of dams to freshwater ecosystems. It identifies the top 21 rivers, such as the Yangtze in China and the Tigris and Euphrates in the Middle East, at risk from dams being planned or under construction, and calls on governments and dam developers to apply the recommendations of the World Commission on Dams.

WORLD RIVERS REVIEW
(International River Network, June 2004) The June issue of IRN’s magazine, World Rivers Review, contains a feature on rivers in the United States, including an excerpt from a new report on alternatives to dams in the US, and a commentary on the Bush administration’s new policy that allows hatchery-raised fish to be counted in determining whether Pacific coast fish runs are endangered. The issue also includes stories on: the deferral of a dam scheme in China; a protest to influence Brazilian policies on large dams; the World Bank’s re-emerging efforts to promote large dams; how the World Commission on Dams guidelines have entered EU legislation; and how renewable energy can invigorate Africa’s energy sector and provide jobs.

Climate and energy

CAN GEOLOGICAL CARBON STORAGE BE COMPETITIVE?
(CICERO, 2004) This new working paper from Norwegian think-tank CICERO considers the costs and benefits of geological carbon storage. Authors Steffen Kallbekken and Asbjørn Torvanger argue that, in the short-term, carbon capture and storage is unlikely to be an economically-viable option, except under very specific circumstances (such as enhanced oil recovery). However, in the longer term, the paper suggests that technological improvements could see costs drop, and the financial feasibility of carbon storage improve.

PER CAPITA GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS FOR ANNEX I COUNTRIES
(Australia Institute/IIASA, 2004) Hal Turton of the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis in Austria has written a report looking at per capita emissions from the world’s industrialized countries and states belonging to the former Soviet Bloc (known collectively as “Annex I” countries under the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change). Published by the Australia Institute, the report finds that Australia has the highest emissions per person at 27.2 tonnes of carbon dioxide equivalent. This is 27% higher than those in the United States, and twice the average for Annex I Parties overall. A summary of the report is available online.

THE PRICE OF POWER: POVERTY, CLIMATE CHANGE, THE COMING ENERGY CRISIS AND THE RENEWABLE REVOLUTION
(New Economics Foundation, 2004) This new report by Andrew Simms, Julian Oram and Petra Kjell argues that a continuing reliance on fossil fuels will perpetuate poverty and could drive a huge “reversal of human progress.” It shows that increased investment in renewable energy could save millions of lives and avert an impending crisis over global energy supplies. Even a relatively small shift in investment in the energy sector in percentage terms could have hugely beneficial consequences for people’s health and economic wellbeing. The report also argues against the current subsidies for coal, oil and gas, which it estimates amount to at least US$235 billion each year.

Forests, deserts, land


PRESERVING OUR COMMON GROUND: UNCCD 10 YEARS ON
(UNCCD Secretariat, 2004) The CCD Secretariat prepared this magazine to coincide with the 17 June 2004 celebration of the UNCCD’s 10th anniversary. The text consists of a number of articles, commencing with reviews of the Convention’s ten years and contribution to sustainable development by Kofi Annan, Maurice Strong and Hama Arba Diallo, among others. Additional articles include discussions of the Secretariat and Global Mechanism and the experience of Italy. It is available in English and French.

MUNICIPAL FOREST MANAGEMENT IN LATIN AMERICA
(Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR), 2003) This text, edited by Lyes Ferroukhi, uses case studies from Bolivia, Brazil, Costa Rica, Guatemala, Honduras, and Nicaragua to analyze the trend among local municipal governments to establish offices and commissions to address forestry and environmental issues. The contributors illustrate that local governments and populations are becoming increasingly involved in decision-making on issues that affect forest use and management, and that decentralization “from below” has taken root. The book concludes, however, that real decentralized forest management “is still an incipient process that will require much more time, political will and institutional and social agreements if its positive effects are to become generalized.”

WHO PAYS FOR AND WHO BENEFITS FROM IMPROVED TIMBER HARVESTING PRACTICES IN THE TROPICS? LESSONS LEARNED AND INFORMATION GAPS
(CIFOR, 2004) In this study, authors Grahame Applegate, Francis E. Putz and Laura K. Snook analyze four components of improved timber harvesting practices (stock and topographic mapping, directional felling, road planning and construction, and skid trail and road closure) on the basis of who pays the costs of implementation and who derives the benefits over both short and long terms. The objective of this study is to aid efforts to identify which improved timber harvesting practices may require incentives and which can be considered the responsibility of the timber harvesting company or contractor.
 


Environment and health

SECRETARY-GENERAL’S REPORT: PRODUCTS HARMFUL TO HEALTH AND THE ENVIRONMENT
This report is submitted in compliance with General Assembly resolution 39/229, in which the Secretary-General was requested to report every three years through ECOSOC on products harmful to health and the environment. It provides an overview of activities undertaken by UN organizations in the area of environmentally sound management of chemicals since the previous triennial review in 2001. The report also contains recommendations for consideration by ECOSOC, and includes the “Consolidated List of Products Whose Consumption and/or Sale have been Banned, Withdrawn, Severely Restricted or Not Approved by Governments,” which is prepared in cooperation with UNEP and WHO and contains restrictive regulatory decisions on chemicals and pharmaceuticals.

ENVIRONMENT & HEALTH: MYTHS & REALITIES
(International Policy Press, June 2004) Edited by Kendra Okonski and Julian Morris, this book provides an overview of existing scientific evidence concerning the impact of pesticides, dioxin, nitrates, radiation, endocrine disruptors, global warming and the precautionary principle on human health, and challenges the conventional wisdom that human health problems (cancer, disease and death) are caused and aggravated by modern industrial society. The contributors highlight that many environment and health risks have been exaggerated, "to the detriment of scientific research and public policy," and caution that “scare stories” used by the media and activist groups to influence government regulations result in economic harm, and a lack of prioritization with few or no benefits to people. The book was launched in conjunction with the Budapest Business Journal, prior to the Fourth WHO Ministerial Conference on Environment and Health held in Budapest from 23-25 June 2004.

INHERITING THE WORLD: THE ATLAS OF CHILDREN’S HEALTH AND THE ENVIRONMENT
(WHO, 2004) According to the WHO over three million children die annually due to unhealthy environments. This book is authored by Bruce Gordon, Richard Mackay and Eva Rehfuess and produced for the WHO ahead of the Fourth WHO Ministerial Conference on Environment and Health held in Budapest in June 2004. The book is divided into three parts, each containing chapters that illustrate with maps, graphs and diagrams the link between children’s health and the environment. Part One of the atlas focuses on child health and poverty, while Part Two focuses on global issues that impact children’s health, including: water and sanitation; smoking; air pollution; child labor; lead; UV radiation exposure; and climate change.

THE BUDAPEST COLLECTION
Launched at the Fourth WHO Ministerial Conference on Environment and Health, this collection represents the first WHO e-library on children’s health and environment. It comprises over 100 documents on the effect of environmental risk factors on children’s health, including risks associated with outdoor and indoor air pollution, water and sanitation, chemicals, injuries, food safety and nutrition, global climate change, socioeconomic determinants and tobacco.

ENVIRONMENTAL BURDEN OF DISEASE REPORT: BURDEN OF DISEASE AND INJURIES ATTRIBUTABLE TO SELECTED ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS AMONGST EUROPE’S CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS
(The Lancet, 19 June 2004) Published in the June 19 issue of “The Lancet,” this study is a first attempt at assessing the overall impact of the environment on child health in the WHO European Region. Its findings indicate that in the European Region, about one out of three of all childhood ill health from birth to 19 years can be attributed to unsafe and unhealthy environments, thus underscoring the need for policy interventions to reduce children’s exposure to outdoor and indoor air pollution, unsafe water, and lead, and to prevent injuries.

GUIDELINES ON DEVELOPING CONSUMER INFORMATION ON PROPER USE OF TRADITIONAL, COMPLEMENTARY AND ALTERNATIVE MEDICINES
 
(WHO, January 2004) Prepared by the World Health Organization, these technical guidelines seek to assist Member States in developing context-specific and reliable consumer information concerning the proper use of traditional medicine and complementary and alternative medicine. WHO recognizes the long-term goal of maximizing the benefits and minimizing the risks in the use of such medicines by empowering consumers to make informed choices and become active participants in healthcare. WHO also underscores that efforts to promote the proper use of such medicines through consumer education/training must also be supported by other measures such as: the establishment of national laws and regulations to control herbal medicines products; efforts to ensure the qualified practice of traditional and alternative therapies; and, where appropriate, measures to control information about such approaches used in advertisements. As follow-up to the development of these guidelines, WHO plans to organize a series of inter-regional, regional and national workshops for national health authorities and relevant NGOs on developing consumer information regarding the proper use of alternative and traditional medicines, and on organizing education/training programmes at a national level.

Trade, investment and finance in sustainable development

AFRICAN ECONOMIC OUTLOOK 2003/2004
(AfDB/OECD, May 2004) The AEO is an annual assessment of economic and social developments in African countries. The report shows that despite progress on several fronts and general economic growth in several countries, many will still not be able to achieve the UN Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). This third edition report’s special focus on energy considers whether improvements in energy supply can help alleviate poverty, and concludes that Africa’s huge energy potential remains “vastly under exploited.” Based on data from the 22 most significant African economies, this publication serves as a reference for policy makers, donors and the private sector. The AEO is prepared by the OECD Development Centre and the African Development Bank.

ASIAN DEVELOPMENT OUTLOOK 2004
(Asian Development Bank, 2004) This annual publication analyzes the economic outlook and recent trends for 41 countries in the Asia-Pacific region. For 2003, the report found that the region remained economically robust in spite of anxieties over the Iraq conflict, oil price hikes, and the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) outbreak. Looking ahead, the report forecasts intraregional trade and strong consumer demand to “define the outlook” for the region in 2004-2005. The publication also looks at trends in foreign direct investment.

INVESTING IN STABILITY: CONFLICT RISK, MARKETS AND THE BOTTOM-LINE
(UNEP Finance Initiative/IISD/German Federal Ministry of Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety, 2004) This paper is part of a project designed to “promote the business case for conflict prevention within the financial sector.” The report investigates various voluntary actions that financial institutions such as banks and insurance companies can take to avoid risks, while also supporting peace and development. The paper employs real case studies of both failures and successes. It suggests that UNEP’s Finance Initiative unit should consider launching a multistakeholder platform to encourage dialogue to help financial institutions engage on these issues.

THE MATERIALITY OF SOCIAL, ENVIRONMENTAL AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE ISSUES TO EQUITY PRICING
 
(UNEP FI, June 2004) Companies will suffer a decline in their share prices if they do not take environmental, social and corporate governance issues into consideration. This is one of the key messages arising from a report produced for the UNEP Finance Initiative Asset Management Working Group and launched at the Global Compact Leaders Summit held on 24 June at UN headquarters in New York. Compiled by a group of 12 fund managers representing US$1.6 trillion in managed assets, the report, which is based on 11 sector reports by brokerage house analysts, is the first to examine the financial impact of environmental, social and corporate considerations and criteria on portfolio management of mutual, pension and other institutional funds. The research covered a range of industry sectors, including aviation, clothing, electronics, oil and gas, insurance, pharmaceuticals and utilities. In its research, the project found that European brokerage houses were more willing and able to respond to demand for environmental, social and corporate governance research than their North American counterparts.

NEW UPCOMING MEETINGS


Announcements
: Change of dates

SECOND MEETING OF THE ISP:
13 September 2004 - 15 September 2004. Nairobi, Kenya. The second meeting of UNEP’s high-level open-ended intergovernmental working group for the intergovernmental strategic plan for technology support and capacity-building will be held in Nairobi from 13-15 September 2004. The first day will be dedicated to preparatory informal consultations, followed by a 2-day meeting of the Intergovernmental Working Group. For more information contact: UNEP; tel: +1-212-963-8210; fax: +1-212-963-7341; e-mail: info@nyo.unep.org; Internet: http://www.nyo.unep.org/

Click here for a complete listing of upcoming meetings

The following are upcoming meetings recently added to Linkages website:

Sustainable development

JOHANNESBURG + 2 SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT CONFERENCE:
1 September 2004 - 4 September 2004. Sandton International Convention Centre, Johannesburg, South Africa. This event will be held on the occasion of the second anniversary of the WSSD, incorporating a National Sustainable Development Conference, Thematic Round Tables, Sustainable Development Best Practice Exhibition, a Learning Centre, Media Capacitation Workshop and Doing Business in Africa Workshops. The Conference and Exhibition’s themes include: water and sanitation, human settlements, energy, agriculture and food Security, technology, natural resource management, regional Development and NEPAD. South Africa’s President Mbeki and a number of other high-level participants are expected to attend. For more information contact: South African Department of Environmental Affairs and Tourism; tel: +27-12-310-3911; fax: +27-12-322-2682; Internet: http://www.environment.gov.za/Documents/Documents/2004Jun28/jhb2_28062004.html

IV AFRICAN DEVELOPMENT FORUM: GOVERNANCE FOR A PROGRESSING AFRICA:
11 October 2004 - 15 October 2004. Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Organized by the UN Economic Commission for Africa (ECA) in partnership with the African Union and the African Development Bank, this event aims to establish an Africa-driven development agenda. For more information contact: Robert Okello, Coordinator; tel: +251-1-44-30-40; fax: +251-1-51-44-16; e-mail: rokello@uneca.org; Internet: http://www.uneca.org/adf/adfiv/index.htm

FIRST AFRICAN YOUTH SUMMIT ON GLOBALIZATION:
6 April 2005 - 10 April 2005. Abuja, Nigeria. This summit is an off-shoot of the 2003 World Youth Summit on Globalisation held in Brussels and the 2004 Youth and Globalisation Conference held in Strasbourg. The summit aims to produce a strategic plan, a youth-oriented development roadmap on globalization issues and involvement in Africa, targeted at enhancing civic participation and active youth involvement in globalization processes and policies. For more information contact: tel: +32-475-269-803; fax: +1-530-579-5543; e-mail: aysg_summit@yahoo.co.uk; Internet: http://www.dgroups.org/groups/education/index.cfm?cat_id=1918&msgid=132882&op=dsp_showmsg

WORLD SUMMIT ON THE INFORMATION SOCIETY - TUNIS PHASE:
16 November 2005 - 18 November 2005. Tunis, Tunisia. The preparatory process for the Tunis phase of the WSIS entails a process of monitoring and evaluation of the progress of feasible actions laid out in the Geneva Plan and a concrete set of deliverables that must be achieved by the time the Summit meets in Tunis in November 2005. Efforts are now being made to put the Plan of Action into motion and working groups are being set up to find solutions and reach agreements in the fields of Internet governance and financing mechanisms. Measures will also be taken to bridge the digital divide and hasten the achievement of the MDGs with the help of ICTs. For more information contact: tel: +41-22-730-6316; fax: +41-22-730-6393; e-mail: wsis@itu.int; Internet: http://www.itu.int/wsis/index-p2.html

Biodiversity and wildlife

FOURTH EUROPEAN CONFERENCE ON THE CONSERVATION OF WILD PLANTS:
17 August 2004 - 20 August 2004. Valencia, Spain. Organized by Planta Europe, the network of organizations for the preservation and sustainable use of wild flora in Europe, this conference aims to contribute to the implementation of the Global Strategy for Plant Conservation in Europe. Its key topics are progress in plant conservation in Europe, and development of the European Strategy for Plant Conservation. For more information contact: Planta Europa; tel: +34-9632-79932; e-mail: floraval@gva.es; Internet: http://www.nerium.net/plantaeuropa/index.htm

SIXTH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF WILDLIFE IN AMAZONIA AND LATIN AMERICA: LESSONS LEARNT:
5 September 2004 - 10 September 2004. Iquitos, Peru. This conference is organized by the Universidad Nacional de la Amazonía Peruana, the University of Kent at Canterbury, UK, and Wildlife Conservation Society. For more information contact: e-mail: congresofauna@qmauta.rcp.pe; Internet: http://www.vicongreso.com.pe/

MEETING OF THE AD HOC TECHNICAL EXPERT GROUP ON ISLAND BIODIVERSITY:
6 September 2004 - 10 September 2004. Canary Islands, Spain. This meeting is organized by the Secretariat of the Convention on Biological Diversity. For more information contact: tel: +1-514-288-2220; fax: +1-514-288-6588; e-mail: secretariat@biodiv.org; Internet: http://www.biodiv.org/doc/meeting.aspx?lg=0&mtg=TEGIB-01

REGIONAL WORKSHOP FOR AFRICA ON SYNERGY AMONG THE RIO CONVENTIONS AND OTHER BIODIVERSITY-RELATED CONVENTIONS IN IMPLEMENTING THE PROGRAMMES OF WORK ON DRY AND SUB-HUMID LANDS AND AGRICULTURAL BIODIVERSITY:
13 September 2004 - 17 September 2004. Gaborone, Botswana. This workshop is organized by the Secretariat of the Convention on Biological Diversity. For more information contact: CBD Secretariat; tel: +1-514-288-2220; fax: +1-514-288-6588; e-mail: secretariat@biodiv.org; Internet: http://www.biodiv.org/doc/meeting.aspx?lg=0&mtg=WSAGDL-01

CONSERVATION OF ARCTIC FLORA AND FAUNA X BIENNIAL MEETING:
14 September 2004 - 16 September 2004. Anchorage, Alaska, US. This meeting is organized by Conservation of Arctic Flora and Fauna. For more information contact: CAFF; tel: +1-354-462-3350; fax: +1-354-462-3390; e-mail: caff@caff.is; Internet: http://www.caff.is/events/frettir.asp?id=48

13TH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON AQUATIC INVASIVE SPECIES:
20 September 2004 - 24 September 2004. Ennis, County Clare, Ireland. This annual conference series is widely considered the most comprehensive international forum for the review of accumulated scientific knowledge on the impacts of aquatic invasive species, presentation of the latest field research and related data, introduction of new technologies and advancements in control and mitigation, and discussion of policy and approaches to effective public education and outreach initiatives to prevent new introductions. For more information contact: tel: +1-613-732-7068; fax: +1-613-732-3386; e-mail: profedge@renc.igs.net; Internet: http://www.aquatic-invasive-species-conference.org/conference-home.htm

EIGHTH INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM ON THE BIOSAFETY OF GENETICALLY MODIFIED ORGANISMS:
26 September 2004 - 30 September 2004. Montpellier, France. Organized by the International Society for Biosafety Research, this symposium will be held under the theme “How Scientific Research Informs Biosafety Decisions.” A special workshop will discuss North-South issues related to biosafety of GMOs. For more information contact: International Society for Biosafety Research; tel: +33-1-30-83-37-30; fax: +33-1-30-83-37-28; e-mail: isbgmo@versailles.inra.fr; Internet: http://www.inra.fr/gmobiosafety/aboutsymposium.php

10TH REGULAR SESSION OF THE COMMISSION ON GENETIC RESOURCES FOR FOOD AND AGRICULTURE (CGRFA):
8 November 2004 - 12 November 2004. Rome, Italy. This meeting is organized by FAO. For more information contact: Alvaro Toledo; tel: +39-6-5705-2753; fax: +39-6-5705-6347; e-mail: Alvaro.Toledo@fao.org; Internet: http://www.fao.org/ag/cgrfa/

SECOND MEETING OF THE CGRFA ACTING AS THE INTERIM COMMITTEE FOR THE INTERNATIONAL TREATY ON PLANT GENETIC RESOURCES FOR FOOD AND AGRICULTURE (ITPGR):
15 November 2004 - 19 November 2004. Rome, Italy. This meeting is organized by FAO. For more information contact: Alvaro Toledo; tel: +39-6-5705-2753; fax: +39-6-5705-6347; e-mail: Alvaro.Toledo@fao.org; Internet: http://www.fao.org/ag/cgrfa/

SECOND MEETING OF THE PARTIES TO ACCOBAMS:
9 November 2004 - 12 November 2004. Mallorca, Spain. The second meeting of the Parties to the Agreement on the Conservation of Cetaceans of the Black Sea, Mediterranean Sea and Contiguous Atlantic Area (ACCOBAMS) is organized by the Convention on Migratory Species. For more information contact: tel: +377-93-15-8010; fax: +377-93-50-9591; e-mail: mcvanklaveren@gouv.mc; Internet: http://www.accobams.mc

Climate and atmosphere

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON RENEWABLE ENERGY SOURCES - EU POLICIES, INTERNAL MARKET AND LOCAL COMMUNITIES:
6 July 2004. Genoa, Italy. This conference aims to develop synergies between energy, environmental and cultural issues, particularly concerning stakeholder involvement in renewables projects, with a focus on wind, photovoltaic and biomass initiatives. For more information contact: Maria Fabianelli, Director; tel: +39-010-840-3343; fax: +39-010-840-3397; e-mail: are.liguria@filse.it; Internet: http://www.managenergy.net/conference/genoa0704.html

INTERNATIONAL WORKSHOP ON TRANSPORTATION AND THE CDM:
25 August 2004 - 27 August 2004. Santiago, Chile. This workshop is organized as part of a project between IISD, the Center for Clean Air Policy, and Climate Change & Development in collaboration with the government of Chile, that seeks to examine the feasibility of CDM projects in the transport sector. For more information contact: Jodi Browne, Project Manager, Climate Change & Energy, IISD; tel: +1-613-238-9821; e-mail: jbrowne@iisd.ca; Internet: http://www.iisd.org/climate/south/ctp.asp

IPCC EXPERT MEETING ON INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT, TRANSFER AND DIFFUSION:
21 September 2004 - 23 September 2004. Tokyo, Japan. As one of the steps in preparing for the contribution towards the IPCC Fourth Assessment Report (due 2007), Working Group III of IPCC (Mitigation of Climate change) will hold an Expert Meeting on Industrial Technology Development, Transfer and Diffusion (on invitation only). This meeting aims at increasing the involvement of Industry in the contribution of Working Group III with regard to technology development, transfer and diffusion. For more information contact: IPCC Secretariat; tel: +41-22-730-8208; fax: +41-22-730-8025; e-mail: IPCC-Sec@wmo.int; Internet: http://www.ipcc.ch/othernews/itdt.htm

22ND SESSION OF THE IPCC:
8 November 2004 - 11 November 2004. New Delhi, India. The 22nd session of the IPCC will take place from 8-11 November 2004 in New Delhi, India. For more information contact: IPCC Secretariat; tel: +41-22-730-8208; fax: +41-22-730-8025; e-mail: IPCC-Sec@wmo.int; Internet: http://www.ipcc.ch/calendar.htm

EMA EMERGING MARKETS CONFERENCE: EMISSIONS & RENEWABLES:
14 November 2004 - 17 November 2004. Houston, Texas, US. For more information contact: David Feldner, EMA Executive Director; tel: +1-414-276-3819; fax: +1-414-276-3349; e-mail: dfeldner@emissions.org; Internet: http://www.emissions.org/conferences/houston04/

Forests, deserts, land

SECOND WORLDWIDE SYMPOSIUM ON GENDER AND FORESTRY:
1 August 2004 - 10 August 2004. Arusha, Tanzania. This event will focus on women and forestry, gender, poverty and sustainable development, forest resource use and income generating activities for local people, ideology, religion and environmental responsibility. For more information contact: Merete Furuberg, Hedmark University College, Evenstad, 2480 Koppang, Norway; tel: +47-90-163092; fax: +47-62-945753; e-mail: merete.furuberg@hedmark-f.kommune.no; Internet: http://www.cifor.cgiar.org/docs/_ref/publications/newsonline/35/event.htm

FORESTLEADERSHIP CONFERENCE:
1 March 2005 - 4 March 2005. Toronto, Canada. Held under the theme ‘Partnerships towards Sustainability,’ this conference will address the development of multistakeholder partnerships in the area of forest sustainability. For more information contact: Carole Zabbal; tel: +1-514-274-4344; e-mail: info@ForestLeadership.com; Internet: http://www.ForestLeadership.com

Human development

GLOBAL FORUM FOR LEAST DEVELOPED COUNTRIES (LDC):
7 July 2004 - 9 July 2004. Mauritius. This conference aims to convene high-level decision makers to identify innovative development solutions and practical strategies for deploying Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) projects to help integrate the poorest countries into the global economy. For more information contact: Cosmas Zavazava, Head, LDC Unit, Telecommunication Development Bureau, ITU; tel: +41-22-730-5447; e-mail: cosmas.zavazava@itu.int; Internet: http://www.itu.int/ITU-D/ldc/events.html

PREPCOM 2 OF THE TUNIS PHASE OF THE WSIS:
17 February 2005 - 25 February 2005. Geneva, Switzerland. For more information contact: tel: +41-22-730-6316; fax: +41-22-730-6393; e-mail: wsis@itu.int; Internet: http://www.itu.int/wsis/preparatory2/index.html

WORLD SUMMIT ON THE INFORMATION SOCIETY - TUNIS PHASE:
16 November 2005 - 18 November 2005. Tunis, Tunisia. The preparatory process for the Tunis phase of the WSIS entails a process of monitoring and evaluation of the progress of feasible actions laid out in the Geneva Plan and a concrete set of deliverables that must be achieved by the time the Summit meets in Tunis in November 2005. Efforts are now being made to put the Plan of Action into motion and working groups are being set up to find solutions and reach agreements in the fields of Internet governance and financing mechanisms. Measures will also be taken to bridge the digital divide and hasten the achievement of the MDGs with the help of ICTs. For more information contact: tel: +41-22-730-6316; fax: +41-22-730-6393; e-mail: wsis@itu.int; Internet: http://www.itu.int/wsis/index-p2.html

Trade, finance and investment in sustainable development

CONFERENCE ON PROFITABLE SUSTAINABILITY - THE FUTURE OF BUSINESS:
26 September 2004 - 29 September 2004. Seattle, Washington, US. This conference aims to demonstrate regional and national best sustainability practices, provide tools for business managers and leaders, and foster strategic alliances. For more information contact: Warren Northrop, Network for Business Innovation and Sustainability/Future 500; tel: +1-206-296-2469; e-mail: conference@nbis.org; Internet: http://www.nbis.org/conference/

Water, wetlands, oceans, coasts

BLUE VISION CONFERENCE:
11 July 2004 - 13 July 2004. Washington, DC,, US. This conference will bring together ocean organizations and activists in exploring ways to restore America's seas and coastal communities. For more information contact: David Helvarg, Blue Frontier Campaign; tel: +1-202-387-8030; e-mail: Helvarg@bluefront.org; Internet: http://www.bluevizmeet.com/sponsor.htm

SEVENTH ASIAN FISHERIES FORUM:
30 November 2004 - 4 December 2004. Penang, Malaysia. Organized by the Asian Fisheries Society, this Forum will include symposia, plenary and technical sessions to address the status of Asian fisheries. For more information contact: Forum Secretariat; tel: +60-4-653-3888 ext.3961; fax: +60-4-656-5125; e-mail: 7aff2004@usm.my; Internet: http://www.usm.my/7AFF2004

FIRST INTERNATIONAL MARINE PROTECTED AREAS CONGRESS:
23 October 2005 - 27 October 2005. Geelong, Australia. This international congress aims to address the World Commission on Protected Areas� Marine goal and primary themes, and advance discussion on their widespread adoption and implementation consistent with resolutions relevant to marine protected areas arising from the Durban World Parks Congress. For more information contact: Congress Organizers; tel: +61-3-5983-2400; fax: +61-3-5983-2223; e-mail: sm@asnevents.net.au; Internet: http://www.impacongress.org/
 

Linkages is provided by the International Institute for Sustainable Development, publishers of the Earth Negotiations Bulletin.
It is designed to be an electronic clearing-house for information on past and upcoming international meetings
related to environment and development policy.