Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Google Plus

2nd Africa Ecosystem Based Adaptation for Food Security Conference 2015 (EBAFOSC 2)

30-31 July 2015 | UN Environment Programme (UNEP) headquarters, Nairobi, Kenya


Summary Highlights of EBAFOSC 2

Download ENB+ Meeting Report

Reports:
Summary

Receive our ENB+ bulletins and reports by email:

Photo Usage Information
Natural Resources Policy & Practice
Loading...

Receive emailed updates with the news articles above plus related information and announcements from our NATURAL RESOURCES community mailing lists:

Choose Mailing List:
Enter Email Address:
Daily Web CoverageAbout | 30 Jul | 31 Jul | Summary
.
.

Delegates to the 2nd Africa Ecosystem Based Adaptation for Food Security Conference 2015 (EBAFOSC 2) pose for a group photo.


The 2nd Africa Ecosystem Based Adaptation for Food Security Conference (EBAFOSC 2) took place from 30-31 July 2015 at UN Environment Programme (UNEP) Headquarters in Nairobi, Kenya, under the theme ‘Re-imagining Africa’s Food Security through Harnessing Ecosystem Based Adaptation Approaches Now and Into the Future under Climate Change.’ More than 1200 delegates from governments, research and policy institutions, civil society, the private sector and youth organizations attended the event, which was convened by the UNEP Regional Office for Africa (UNEP/ROA) and partner organizations.

The Conference was structured around plenary and parallel discussion sessions that aimed to contribute to seven core objectives: harnessing ecosystem-based adaptation (EBA) to protect and restore Africa’s ecosystems and contribute to a sustainable overall agricultural policy framework; building scalable and inclusive business models for EBA-driven agriculture that can create opportunities across the entire agricultural value chain; identifying scalable and innovative financing models for EBA-driven agriculture to stimulate growth, job creation and value chain partnerships in Africa; understanding the benefits of EBA in achieving the proposed Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs); identifying enabling policies and legislation that will incentivize countries to invest in agriculture, soil conservation and EBA; gaining knowledge on key agents that can help transform the dominant agricultural development paradigms towards EBA-driven agriculture in Africa; and developing strategies to incentivize private sector involvement in EBA-driven agriculture for increased capital mobilization and competitiveness.

EBAFOSC 2 produced two main outcome documents: ‘The Nairobi Action Agenda on Africa’s Ecosystem Based Adaptation for Food Security’; and a Constitution establishing a new pan-African institution, the Ecosystem Based Adaptation for Food Security Assembly (EBAFOSA). Following closing remarks by Rhoda Peace Tumusiime, Commissioner for Rural Economy and Agriculture, African Union Commission (AUC), Conference Chair Alice Kaudia, Environment Secretary, Ministry of Environment, Kenya, declared EBAFOSC 2 closed at 3:15 pm on Friday 31 July.

+ IISD Reporting Services, through its ENB+ Meeting Coverage, provided a summary of the EBAFOSC 2 in HTML and PDF format.


Highlights for Friday, 31 July 2015

From L-R: Alice Kaudia, Environment Secretary, Ministry of Environment, Kenya, and Chair of the Conference; Cosmas Ochieng, Executive Director, African Centre for Technology Studies (ACTS); Wilbur Ottichillo, MP Kenya National Assembly; Richard Munang, Coordinator, Africa Regional Climate Change Programme at the UNEP Regional Office for Africa (UNEP/ROA); Michael O’Brien-Onyeka, Executive Director, Greenpeace Africa; and Daniel Gad, Board Chairman, Ethiopian Horticulture Cooperative


On Friday, EBAFOSC 2 delegates met in plenary discussions throughout the day to explore policy issues related to scaling up EBA-driven agriculture on the continent, as well as practical recommendations for the way forward.

The first plenary session, on ‘Making EBA work in Africa through maximizing policy frameworks,’ explored, among other issues: why current policies are not working for EBA-driven agriculture; how to mainstream EBA concepts within existing regional policy frameworks and political processes; new forms of public and private investment that can support the transformation of Africa’s agricultural paradigm; and how to generate resources for knowledge generation, dissemination and capacity building.

In the second plenary session, titled ‘Way forward – plans and strategies for implementing and scaling up EBA approaches and agro-value chains to ensure food security, ecosystem productivity, climate resilience and income generation,’ delegates exchanged views on, among other issues: the roles of different stakeholders in implementing and monitoring the progress of EBA-driven agriculture at the local, national and regional levels; and how to foster collaboration and increased synergies among the various levels.

During the closing session in the afternoon, participants adopted ‘The Nairobi Action Agenda on Africa’s Ecosystem Based Adaptation for Food Security’ as well as, the Constitution establishing a new pan-African institution, the Ecosystem Based Adaptation for Food Security Assembly (EBAFOSA). Following closing remarks by Rhoda Peace Tumusiime, Commissioner for Rural Economy and Agriculture, AUC, Conference Chair Alice Kaudia, Environment Secretary, Ministry of Environment, Kenya, declared EBAFOSC 2 closed at 3:15 pm.

+ IISD Reporting Services, through its ENB+ Meeting Coverage, provided a summary the of EBAFOSC 2 in HTML and PDF format.

+ Visit the web coverage for Thursday, 31 July 2015.


Wilbur Ottichillo, MP, Kenya National Assembly

Daniel Gad, Ethiopian Horticulture Cooperative



Alice Kaudia, Ministry of Environment, Kenya

Richard Munang, UNEP/ROA


During the interactive plenary discussions, many participants provided suggestions on how to turn EBA policies into action.


Yanira Ntupanyama, Ministry of Environment, Malawi

Jephias Matunhu, Midlands State University, Zimbabwe

Cosmas Ochieng, ACTS


Umezuruike Linus Opara, Stellenbosch University, South Africa

Dennis Garrity, UN Convention to Combat Desertification (UNCCD) Drylands Ambassador

Presentation of Recommendations and “Next Steps”


Robert Wabunoha, UNEP/ROA, presented the conference outcome documents for adoption.

Patrick Luganda, Chair of the Drafting Committee, explained the process used to prepare the final conference outcomes.


Rhoda Peace Tumusiime, Commissioner for Rural Economy and Agriculture, AUC, delivered her address during the closing session.

Mounkaila Goumandakoye, Regional Director, UNEP/ROA



Highlights for Friday, 30 July 2015

The 2nd Ecosystem Based Adaptation for Food Security Conference (EBAFOSC 2) opened on Thursday 30 July 2015 at the UN Environment Programme (UNEP) Headquarters in Nairobi, on the theme ‘Re-imagining Africa’s Food Security through Harnessing Ecosystem Based Adaptation Approaches Now and Into the Future under Climate Change.

Following welcome remarks by Richard Munang, Coordinator, Africa Regional Climate Change Programme at the UNEP Regional Office for Africa (UNEP/ROA), delegates heard introductory statements by high-level representatives of key EBAFOSC 2 organizing partners, including: Patrick Kormawa, Food and Agriculture Organization of the UN (FAO) Sub-Regional Coordinator for Eastern Africa and Representative to the African Union (AU) and the UN Economic Commission for Africa (ECA); Cosmas Ochieng, Executive Director, African Centre for Technology Studies (ACTS); Yemi Akinbamijo, Executive Director, Forum for Agricultural Research in Africa (FARA); Agnes Kalibata, President, Alliance for a Green Revolution in Africa (AGRA); Mounkaila Goumandakoye, Regional Director, UNEP/ROA; and Rhoda Peace Tumusiime, Commissioner for Rural Economy and Agriculture, AU Commission (AUC).

During a plenary discussion on ‘Building scalable and inclusive business models for EBA,’ speakers presented challenges and best practices based on research and practical experiences across the continent.

In the afternoon, delegates met in seven parallel sessions addressing the overall theme of 'Making EBA-driven agriculture work in Africa now and into the future - optimizing and unleashing opportunities for EBA-driven agriculture in Africa.' The sessions addressed, inter alia: the role of youth and women in EBA-driven agriculture; innovative financing models; the role of the private sector; south-south cooperation; innovations to reduce post-harvest losses and wastage; and resilience to climate change. During a final closing plenary session, rapporteurs presented highlights from the seven parallel sessions.

+ IISD Reporting Services, through its ENB+ Meeting Coverage, provided a summary the of EBAFOSC 2 in HTML and PDF format.

+ Visit the web coverage for Thursday, 30 July 2015.


High Level Opening Session

From L-R: Agnes Kalibata, President, Alliance for a Green Revolution in Africa (AGRA);  Anthony Nyong, Head, Gender, Climate Change, and Sustainable Development Unit, African Development Bank (AfDB); Mounkaila Goumandakoye, Regional Director, UNEP/ROA; Rhoda Peace Tumusiime, Commissioner for Rural Economy and Agriculture, AU Commission (AUC); Cosmas Ochieng, Executive Director, African Centre for Technology Studies (ACTS); and Yemi Akinbamijo, Executive Director, Forum for Agricultural Research in Africa (FARA)


Cosmas Ochieng, ACTS

Rhoda Peace Tumusiime, AUC


Patrick Kormawa, FAO

Anthony Nyong, AfDB


Agnes Kalibata, AGRA

Mounkaila Goumandakoye, UNEP/ROA


John Wakiumu, AGRA

Lloyd Mbulwe, Zambia Agriculture Research Institute

Alice Kaudia, Ministry of Environment, Kenya


Delegates following the proceedings.


Discussion Session 1.1: The Role of Youth and Women in EBA-driven Agriculture

From L-R: Yanira Ntupanyama, Ministry of Environment, Malawi;  Alice Kaudia, Ministry of Environment, Kenya; Richard Munang, UNEP/ROA; Tim Mugerwa, President, African Youth Union; and Christina Kwangwari, ActionAid International

Discussion Session 1.2: Financing EBA in Africa - Innovative Financing Models for EBA-driven Agriculture

A view of the room during the discussion session.

Esther Muiruri, Equity Bank Ltd., Kenya


Discussion Session 1.3: Education, ICT, Data and its Role in Transforming EBA-driven Agriculture in Africa

From L-R: Cosmas Ochieng, ACTS; Ken Kinney, Executive Director, The Development Institute, Ghana; Elias Ayuk, Director, UN University, Institute for Natural Resources in Africa (UNU-INRA); and Jephias Matunhu, Midlands State University, Zimbabwe


Discussion Session 1.4: The Role of the Private Sector in Upscaling EBA-driven Agriculture

From L-R: Jeremie Muamba Dinkolobo, CEO, Rolihlahla Agriculture Microfinance Project Ltd;  Bashir Jama, AGRA; Daniel Gad, Board Chairman, Ethiopian Horticulture Cooperative; and Lucy Muchoki, CEO, Pan African Agribusiness and Agroindustry Consortium


 

 


Discussion Session 1.5: The role of South-South Cooperation in Harnessing EBA for Food Security in Africa

From L-R: Mohamed-Yahya Lafdal, Ministry of Environment, Mauritania;  Adebooye Clement, Osun State University, Nigeria; Mao Amis, CEO, African Centre for a Green Economy; Philip Kilonzo, ActionAid; and Pak Sum Low, Academy of Sciences, Malaysia


Discussion Session 1.6: Innovations to Reduce Post-Harvest Losses and Wastage - The Role of EBA

From L-R: U.L. Opara, Stellenbosch University, South Africa; Asad Sarwar Qureshi, International Center for Biosaline Agriculture, United Arab Emirates; George Owusu Essegbey, Director, Science and Technology Policy Research Institute, Ghana; William T. Lanier, NeverIdle Farms Consulting, Ghana; and George Asiimwe, Eastern and Southern Africa Small Scale Farmers’ Forum


 

 


Discussion Session 1.7: Climate Change and Resilience Through EBA

From L-R: Ernest Molua, University of Buea, Cameroon; Ayalneh Bogale, Climate Change & Agriculture, AUC; Michael O’Brien-Onyeka, Executive Director, Greenpeace Africa; and Oluwafunmiso Adeola Olajide, University of Ibadan, Nigeria


 

 


Around the Venue

 


Daily Web CoverageAbout | 30 Jul | 31 Jul | Summary
Funding for coverage of the 2nd Africa Ecosystem-Based Adaptation for Food Security Conference 2015 (EBAFOSC 2) has been provided by the African Centre for Technology Studies (ACTS)