IISD Reporting Services
News the ENB team About us Funders Activities Links Search IISD.org RSS Share on Facebook
Daily Web Coverage
IISD Reporting Services (IISD RS) is producing daily reports and daily web coverage from selected side events. To download our reports, please download the HTML/PDF icons below.
Daily Web Coverage   Summary
 
htm
pdf
14 May 2012   HTML version PDF format
15 May 2012   HTML version PDF format
16 May 2012   HTML version PDF format
17 May 2012   HTML version PDF format
18 May 2012   HTML version PDF format
19 May 2012   HTML version PDF format
21 May 2012   HTML version PDF format
22 May 2012   HTML version PDF format
23 May 2012   HTML version PDF format
24 May 2012   HTML version PDF format
Loading...
Coverage of Selected Side Events at the Bonn Climate Change Conference - May 2012

14-25 May 2012 | Bonn, Germany

Daily web coverage (click on the following links to see our daily web pages)

Coverage on Thursday, 17 May 2012
Rio+20
The Maritim Hotel, venue of the Bonn Climate Change Conference - May 2012.
Sign up for ENB
ENB coverage
Climate Change Policy & Practice
High-Level Panel on the CDM Policy Dialogue – Stakeholder Consultations

Presented by the UNFCCC Secretariat
Prodipto Ghosh, India, asked participants how regional distribution of CDM projects could be improved.
Margaret Mukahanana-Sangarwe, Zimbabwe, asked participants their views on the professionalization of the CDM EB.
Crispian Olver, CDM Policy Dialogue Advisor, listened to participants respond to questions posed on regional distribution, the future of the CDM and unilateral bans on certain types of CERs.

Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) Policy Dialogue High-Level Panel members Margaret Mukahanana-Sangarwe, Zimbabwe, and Prodipto Ghosh, India, invited attendees of the event to respond to questions on: the role of the CDM under plausible future scenarios for the international carbon markets; the relationship between the CDM and new market-based mechanisms (NMMs); whether the CDM should move towards sectoral approaches, and, if this is the case, whether project-by-project offsetting should continue; and whether the CDM should remain embedded in the UNFCCC and, if not, who should operate it. Participants responded to questions from the panel.

On regional distribution of CDM projects, several participants called for using a regional quota system to ensure equitable distribution of projects, noting this is within the mandate of CDM to promote development. One participant said regional quotas would be challenging since companies look for promising investments, which favors regions where there are markets they are interested in. He suggested introducing other financial drivers for companies to locate in under-represented markets. Another participant said a CO2 only mechanism would help address regional distribution, as industrial gases, which are the cheap low-hanging fruit of the CDM, are not found in Africa.

On NMMs, one participant said the needs of investors create a bias towards a project-based approach under the CDM and another underscored that the CDM should focus on project-based approaches. One stressed key issues to address in NMM development are predictability, geographic equity and cost efficiency.

On unilateral bans on specific CERs, one participant emphasized that such decisions should be made in a transparent manner that ensure market predictability for investors. He said these decisions increase the risk for companies investing in projects in least developed countries.

On the CDM Executive Board (EB), participants discussed professionalization of the Board, whether it should remain as a policymaking body or undertake technical work, and the relationship of the CDM EB to the UNFCCC Secretariat. A number of participants noted the need for further consideration of these issues.

.
L-R: Margaret Mukahanana-Sangarwe, Zimbabwe; Prodipto Ghosh, India; and Crispian Olver, CDM Policy Dialogue Advisor.
1 1 1
1
More Information:

cmd.unfccc.int

Contacts:

Niclas Svenningsen (Coordinator) nsvenningsen@unfccc.int

1
1 1 1

 

Progress with the Global Framework for Climate Services (GFCS)

Presented by the World Meteorological Organization (WMO)
Bruno Sekoli, Meteorological Department, Lesotho, explained that the GFCS seeks to serve the needs of climate vulnerable countries.
Adrian Simmons, GCOS Steering Committee, reported that while many observation systems exist, there is no global coordination mechanism.
Kanta Kumari Rigaud, the World Bank, stated that investments in national hydromet services must be flexible to national circumstances and “in it for the long term."

Speakers reported challenges and successes developing climate services, related to the development and implementation of the Global Framework for Climate Services (GFCS), which is a UN partnership to coordinate global initiatives for providing science-based information to decision makers.

Bruno Sekoli, Meteorological Department, Lesotho, cited four priority areas of the GFCS: reducing disaster risk; increasing food security; improving health; and effectively managing water resources.

Filipe Domingos Freires Lucio, WMO, stated that countries lacking capacity to provide climate information are also those areas highly vulnerable to climate change. He acknowledged disseminating information to local decision makers is a challenge. Lucio stated that the user interface platform is an innovative mechanism facilitating dialogue between users and providers and will help tailor services to users’ needs, saving livelihoods and lives.

Adrian Simmons, Global Climate Observational Services (GCOS) Steering Committee, stated that observation systems provide services related to past and present climate vulnerabilities as well as services related to future predictions. He noted one crucial effort of GFCS is data rescue, attempting to digitally capture observations archived on paper.

Kanta Kumari Rigaud, the World Bank, underscored the demand for improved hydromet observational systems in developing countries to improve climate resilience. She noted many sectors require these services, requiring coordination within countries.

Stefan Rösner, Deutscher Wetterdienst (DWD), reviewed Germany’s domestic programme for climate services, involving government agencies, academic institutions and private companies. He outlined the scientific, operational and administrative challenges creating the German Heat Health warning system, as an example.

Motsomi Maletjane, UNFCCC Secretariat, identified capacity building needs to improve the use of climate services for adaptation, including: modernizing observation networks; improving database management systems; promoting educational services; and encouraging stakeholder communication.

Sergio Zelaya Bonilla, UN Convention to Combat Desertification (UNCCD) Secretariat, expressed hope for continuing partnerships between initiatives monitoring services to provide sound policy advice to developing countries.

.
L-R: Filipe Domingos Freires Lucio, WMO; Bruno Sekoli, Lesotho; Adrian Simmons, GCOS Steering Committee; Motsomi Maletjane, UNFCCC Secretariat; Stefan Rösner, Germany; and Sergio Zelaya Bonilla, UNCCD Secretariat
1 1 1
1
More Information:

www.wmo.int

Contacts:

Amir Delju (Coordinator)
adelju@wmo.int

1
1 1 1

 

Toward the Establishment of the Bilateral Offset Credit Mechanism (BOCM) - Utilization to Support the NAMA Implementation

Presented by the Global Environment Centre Foundation (GEC)
Damdin Dagvadorj, Ministry of Nature, Environment and Tourism, Mongolia, said that rapid growth in Mongolia’s carbon-intensive economy means that large mitigation benefits are possible in the country.
Immala Inthaboualy, Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment, Lao PDR, shared his country's efforts to mainstream climate mitigation into national development plans.
Kenji Shiraishi, GEC, introduced a panel on an innovative bilateral mechanism for financing climate mitigation in Asia.

Kenji Shiraishi, GEC, welcomed the panel on Japan’s Bilateral Offset Credit Mechanism (BOCM).

Yuji Mizuno, Ministry of the Environment, Japan, said the purpose of the BOCM is to finance emission reductions in Asian developing countries. He said the BOCM’s decentralized governance, broad project and sector coverage, and streamlined eligibility process, distinguish it from the CDM.

Damdin Dagvadorj, Ministry of Nature, Environment and Tourism, Mongolia, offered a host country perspective on the BOCM’s expected benefits for Mongolia, including improved law enforcement and enhanced programme implementation. He said that BOCM’s success depends on raising awareness about the mechanism, learning through pilot projects, and providing technical and financial support to host country operations.

Immala Inthaboualy, Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment, Lao PDR, said the broad range of projects eligible under BOCM could facilitate mitigation activities across numerous sectors in his country, including: agriculture and food security; forestry and land-use change; energy and transport; urban development; water resources; and industry.

Tomoya Motoda, GEC, described how feasibility studies conducted in collaboration with host countries indicate that practical and standardized methodologies for measuring, reporting and verification (MRV) can help to create an enabling environment for BOCM.

Yasushi Ninomiya, Institute for Global Environmental Strategies (IGES), said that case studies in Mongolia and Lao PDR indicate that MRV methodologies for BOCM should incorporate default project activity values, standardized baselines and a critical review of CDM methodologies.

Makoto Kato, Overseas Environmental Cooperation Center, Japan, noted that all public information on BOCM will be available through an online New Mechanisms Information Platform.

Discussions addressed questions about the BOCM related to the assurance of data integrity, added value to the CDM, and future plans to issue carbon credits.

.
L-R: Tomoya Motoda, GEC; Kenji Shiraishi, GEC (back); Yuji Mizuno, Ministry of the Environment, Japan; Damdin Dagvadorj, Ministry of Nature, Environment and Tourism, Mongolia; Immala Inthaboualy, Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment, Lao PDR; Yasushi Ninomiya, IGES; Makoto Kato, Overseas Environmental Cooperation Center, Japan.
1 1 1
1
More Information:

www.gec.jp

Contacts:

Tomoya Motoda (Coordinator)
cdm-fs@gec.jp

1
1 1 1

 

Following the Money: Reviewing Fast-Start Finance Contributions

Presented by the World Resources Institute (WRI)
Daisy Streatfeild, Department of Energy and Climate Change, United Kingdom, shared that the United Kingdom is on track to reach its FSF pledge by the end of the year.
Monica Araya, Costa Rica, commented on the report, providing expert findings that document inequalities in regional distribution of FSF.
Smita Nakhooda, ODI, explained that different countries take different approaches to identifying finances for FSF.

Moderator Rob Bradley, Ministry of Foreign Affairs, United Arab Emirates (UAE), framed the presentation of research and panel perspectives as an opportunity to build trust and provide support for the negotiations ahead.

Taryn Fransen, WRI, introduced two working papers examining fast-start finance (FSF) contributions from the US and the United Kingdom, aimed to better understand how FSF is defined, delivered and reported, indicating that a similar paper on Japan is under development. She reported findings, inter alia: mitigation projects receive the largest share of FSF; the United Kingdom uses multilateral climate funds most frequently, while the US uses bilateral channels; and Africa is mostly support by the United Kingdom and Asia by the US.

Smita Nakhooda, ODI, summarized that both the US and United Kingdom have increased support for climate finance, including credit for projects and programmes supported prior to 2008. She identified further capacity is required to track disbursement, and improve transparency and reporting.

Daisy Streatfeild, Department of Energy and Climate Change, United Kingdom, discussed efforts to meet pledge requirements, improve reporting and transparency. She acknowledged the value of the papers, responding to the issue of additionality, suggesting that early action previous to the mandate should be rewarded rather than counted against overall efforts.

Jessica Brown, US, spoke of the US commitment to transparency and improvement, discussing the challenges in reporting numbers. She commented on the proportion of funding allocated to mitigation, clarifying that grant-based funding is more balanced. She noted the challenge of counting funding that is integrated into other finance sectors, such as development.

Monica Araya, Costa Rica, speaking in her own capacity, acknowledged the underlying issue of trust in negotiations and how research removes opinions and allows feedback by addressing: how much money is flowing; where it is flowing; and why it is flowing. She called for improved accounting and accountability to build trust and ultimately reduce emissions.

Yolando Velasco, UNFCCC Secretariat, in his personal capacity, shared that although the UNFCCC is the repository for FSF reports and will publish findings, it has no mandate for analysis. He highlighted the need for similar studies in more donor countries to guide policy development.

.
L-R: Yolando Velasco, UNFCCC Secretariat; Monica Araya, Costa Rica; Daisy Streatfeild, Department of Energy and Climate Change, United Kingdom; Rob Bradley, UAE; Jessica Brown, US; and Smita Nakhooda, ODI.
1 1 1
1
More Information:

www.wri.org

Contacts:

Raquel Gonzalez (Coordinator) raquelgonzalez@gmail.com

1
1 1 1

 

Launch of the Global "Organic Soils and Peatlands Climate Change Mitigation Initiative"

Presented by Wetlands International
Susanna Tol, Wetlands International, said that 15% of global peatlands have been drained and contribute 6% of global emissions.
Maisa Tapio-Bistrom, FAO, officially launched the Initiative, noting the mitigation potential of restoring cultivated organic soils.
Hans Joosten, Greifswald University, concluded that “peatlands must remain wet!”

Moderator Tiina Vahanen, FAO, introduced the panel on peatlands. Susanna Tol, Wetlands International, highlighted peatland drainage is driven by forestry, agriculture and grazing. She said land use, land-use change and forestry and REDD+ initiatives, and the Work Programme on agriculture are opportunities for addressing emissions from peatlands under the UNFCCC.

Maisa Tapio-Bistrom, FAO, launched the Organic Soils and Peatlands Climate Change Mitigation Initiative, highlighting their partnership on this issue with Wetlands International. She said the Initiative would help develop guidelines and technical advice and raise awareness to reduce peatlands emissions.

Hans Joosten, Greifswald University, presented the report Peatlands - Guidance for Climate Change Mitigation by Conservation, Rehabilitation and Sustainable Use. He said peatlands have changed from a carbon sink to a carbon source, despite 80% remaining conserved. He said the report highlights that “non-used” peatlands are not “useless,” but provide important ecosystem services.

Aletta Bonn, IUCN United Kingdom, provided a case study of peatlands management in the United Kingdom, noting that only 20% of United Kingdom peatlands are undamaged, but still provide a range of ecosystem services. She said there are relatively low-tech and cheap options for peatland restoration, saying the largest benefit of restoration is avoided carbon loss.

Marcel Silvius, Wetlands International, highlighted tropical peatland problems in South East Asia, including: deforestation; drainage for agriculture and plantations; limited development alternatives; and weak governance. He noted that palm oil causes eight times the emissions of conventional fuels due to peatland degradation, which is often not accounted for in determining its carbon intensity. He called for: conservation; stopping unsustainable land-use; and rewetting.

Panel Members Louis Verchot, Center for International Forest Research, Silvius, Joosten, Bonn, and Aulikka Kaupila, European Commission, discussed steps to capitalize on the mitigation potential of peatlands, desired outcomes from Doha on peatlands, and ways the Initiative could contribute to such outcome. Verchot said getting the numbers right and, with Kaupila, that funding REDD+, are important next steps. Panelists highlighted the importance of monitoring, awareness raising and conservation.

.
L-R: Marcel Silvius, Wetlands International; Susanna Tol, Wetlands International; Maisa Tapio-Bistrom, FAO; Hans Joosten, Greifswald University; and Aletta Bonn, IUCN United Kingdom.
1 1 1
1
More Information:

www.wetlands.org

Contacts:

Susanna Tol (Coordinator) susanna.tol@wetlands.org

1
1 1 1

Confronting China's Climate Challenges - Nature Based Solutions to Mitigation and Adaptation

Presented by The Nature Conservancy (TNC)
Xiaoquan Zhang, TNC China, in response to a question, hypothesized that forest carbon could be used as an offset for urban emissions.
Yue Li, Climate Change Adaptation, reported nearly 50% of China’s population rely on climate sensitive sectors, such as agriculture.
Ai Chen, TNC China, underscored that adaptation puts people at risk by altering the ecosystems they rely upon.

The event convened with TNC’s Chinese partners to discuss China’s mitigation and adaptation challenges, as well as TNC’s work to address these challenges. Jian Ma, TNC China, described nature-based solutions as “a simple, but beautiful concept” working on multiple levels to address climate change.

Chunfeng Wang, Forest Carbon, outlined challenges the forest sector faces, including: low quality forest; high pressures from social and economic development; and increased forest fire and disease related to climate change. He described the government's targets for the 12th 5-year period as ambitious, such as increasing forest area by 40 million hectares by 2020.

Xiaoquan Zhang, TNC China, stated that it would be increasingly expensive to improve forest cover because there is limited quality land available. He reported on several TNC demonstration projects to apply a nature-based approach to climate, community and biodiversity (CCB) standards. Zhang also reported on TNC’s activities to support policy development, such as piloting a forest carbon accounting system.

Yue Li, Climate Change Adaptation, reported on numerous climate-related risks, particularly floods and droughts. She outlined adaptation elements in China’s 12th 5-year plan, including: formulating an adaptation strategy; building capacity for adaptation and extreme events; and considering climate change in infrastructure development.

Ai Chen, TNC China, stated that adaptation in China focuses on water, agriculture and food security, but not biodiversity. She outlined how ecosystem-based adaptation could help protect biodiversity, ecosystem services and livelihoods. Chen explained that creating protected areas may be insufficient because species relocate due to climate change, requiring connectivity, redundancy and evolutionary sites.

Sascha Müller-Kraenner, TNC Europe, closed the meeting by reflecting on the need to bring nature-based solutions to the center of climate negotiations and continue work to prove these solutions are efficient and cost-effective for mitigation and adaptation.

.
L-R: Xiaoquan Zhang, TNC China; Chunfeng Wang, Forest Carbon; Jian Ma, TNC China; Sascha Müller-Kraenner, TNC Europe; and Ai Chen, TNC China.
1 1 1
1
More Information:

www.nature.org

Contacts:

Christopher Heishman (Coordinator) cheishman@tnc.org

1
1 1 1
Daily web coverage (click on the following links to see our daily web pages)
up to top
Related Links
UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) resources
*Conference website
*Conference overview schedule
*Conference daily programme
*Conference documents
*Conference workshops
*Conference side events
*Conference exhibits

General resource
*Gateway to the UN System’s Work on Climate Change

IISD RS resources
*IISD RS coverage of the Fifth Global Business Day, 5 December 2011, Durban, South Africa
*IISD RS coverage of Mountain Day, 4 December 2011, Durban, South Africa
*IISD RS coverage of Forest Day 5, 4 December 2011, Durban, South Africa
*IISD RS coverage of Oceans Day at Durban, 3 December 2011, Durban, South Africa
*IISD RS coverage of Development and Climate Days at COP 17, 3-4 December 2011, Durban, South Africa
*IISD RS coverage of the Durban Climate Change Conference - November 2011, 28 November - 11 December 2011, Durban, South Africa
*IISD RS coverage of Selected Side Events at the Durban Climate Change Conference - November 2011, 28 November - 9 December 2011, Durban, South Africa
*IISD RS summary report of the Thirty-fourth Session of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), 18-19 November 2011, Kampala, Uganda (English: HTML - PDF)
*IISD RS coverage of the UN Climate Change Conference October 2011, 1-7 October 2011, Panama City, Panama
*IISD RS briefing note of the 4th Meeting of the Transitional Committee for the Design of the Green Climate Fund (GCF), 16-18 October 2011, Cape Town, South Africa (HTML - PDF)
*IISD RS coverage of the UN Climate Change Conference June 2011, 6-17 June 2011, Bonn, Germany
*IISD RS summary report of the UNFCCC Workshop on Technology Needs Assessments, 1-2 June 2011, Bonn, Germany (English: HTML - PDF) (Japanese: PDF)
*IISD RS summary and analysis of the Thirty-third Session of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), 10-13 May 2011, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates (English: HTML - PDF) (French: HTML - PDF) (Spanish: HTML - PDF) (Japanese: PDF)
*IISD RS coverage of the UN Climate Change Conference Bangkok - April 2011, 3-8 April 2011, UN Conference Centre (UNCC), Bangkok, Thailand
*IISD RS coverage of the Cancún Climate Change Conference, 29 November - 11 December 2010, Cancún, Mexico
*IISD RS coverage of Selected Side Events at the Cancún Climate Change Conference, 29 November - 10 December 2010, Cancún, Mexico
*IISD RS coverage of Cancún Global Business Day, 6 December 2010, Cancún, Mexico
*IISD RS summary report of Development and Climate Days at COP 16, 4-5 December 2010, Cancún, Mexico (HTML - PDF)
*IISD RS summary report of Agriculture and Rural Development Day 2010, 4 December 2010, Cancún, Mexico (HTML - PDF)
*IISD RS summary report of Oceans Day at Cancún, 4 December 2010, Cancún, Mexico (HTML - PDF)
*IISD RS summary and analysis of the Thirty-second Session of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), 11-14 October 2010, Busan, Republic of Korea (English: HTML - PDF) (French: HTML - PDF)
*IISD RS coverage of the Tianjin Climate Change Talks - October 2010, 4-9 October 2010, Tianjin, China
*IISD RS coverage of the Bonn Climate Change Talks - August 2010, 2-6 August 2010, Bonn, Germany
*IISD RS coverage of the Bonn Climate Change Talks - May/June 2010, 31 May - 11 June 2010, Bonn, Germany
*IISD RS summary and analysis of the Bonn Climate Change Talks - April 2010, 9-11 April 2010, Bonn, Germany (English: HTML - PDF) (French: HTML - PDF) (Japanese: PDF)
*IISD RS coverage of the Copenhagen Climate Change Conference, 7-19 December 2009, Copenhagen, Denmark
*IISD RS coverage of Selected Side Events at the Copenhagen Climate Change Conference, 7-19 December 2009, Copenhagen, Denmark
*IISD RS coverage of the Barcelona Climate Change Talks 2009, 2-6 November 2009, Barcelona, Spain
*IISD RS coverage of Selected Side Events at the Barcelona Climate Change Talks 2009, 2-6 November 2009, Barcelona, Spain
*IISD RS summary and analysis of the Thirty-first Session of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), 26-29 October 2009, Bali, Indonesia (English: HTML - PDF) (Spanish: HTML - PDF) (French: HTML - PDF) (Japanese: PDF)
*IISD RS coverage of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) Technical Workshop on Advancing the Integration of Approaches to Adaptation Planning, 2-14 October 2009, UN Conference Centre (UNCC), Bangkok, Thailand
*IISD RS coverage of the Bangkok Climate Change Talks - 2009, 28 September - 9 October 2009, UNCC, Bangkok, Thailand
*IISD RS coverage of the Bonn Climate Change Talks - August 2009, 10-14 August 2009, Bonn, Germany
*IISD RS coverage of the Bonn Climate Change Talks - June 2009, 1-12 June 2009, Bonn, Germany
*IISD RS coverage of Selected Side Events at the Bonn Climate Change Talks - June 2009, 1-12 June 2009, Bonn, Germany
*IISD RS summary and analysis of the Thirtieth Session of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), 21-23 April 2009, Antalya, Turkey (English: HTML - PDF) (Spanish: HTML - PDF) (Japanese: PDF)
*IISD RS coverage of the Bonn Climate Change Talks - March/April 2009, 29 March - 8 April 2009, Bonn, Germany
*IISD RS summary report of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) Workshop on Integrating Practices, Tools and Systems for Climate Risk Assessment and Management and Disaster Risk Reduction Strategies into National Policies and Programmes, 10-12 March 2009, Havana, Cuba (HTML - PDF)
*IISD RS coverage of the UN Climate Change Conference - Poznań, 1-12 December 2008, Poznań, Poland
*IISD RS coverage of Selected Side Events at the Poznań Climate Change Conference, 1-12 December 2008, Poznań, Poland
*IISD RS archive of meetings on climate change, and backgrounder
*Climate-L - A mailing list for news on climate change policy
*Climate Change Policy & Practice - A Knowledgebase of UN and Intergovernmental Activities Addressing Global Climate Change Policy
*Sustainable Development Policy & Practice - A Knowledgebase of International Activities Preparing for the UN Conference on Sustainable Development
*Sustainable Energy Policy & Practice - A Knowledgebase of Sustainable Energy Activities
*SIDS Policy and Practice - A Knowledgebase on the Sustainable Development of Small Island Developing States
*Biodiversity Policy & Practice - A Knowledgebase of UN and Intergovernmental Activities Addressing International Biodiversity Policy
*Linkages Update - Bi-weekly international environment and sustainable development news
*African Regional Coverage
*Latin America and Caribbean Regional Coverage
View HTML version E-mail the Digital Editor should you have any questions regarding the content of this page
| Back to IISD RS "Linkages" | Visit IISDnet | Send e-mail to IISD RS |
© 2012
, IISD. All rights reserved.