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Coverage of Selected Side Events at the Tenth Meeting of the Conference of the Parties (COP 10) to the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD)

Events convened on 22 October 2010 | Nagoya, Japan

CBD COP 10 - Side Events

DAILY WEB COVERAGE
(click on the following links to see our daily web pages)


Monday, 18 October | Tuesday, 19 October

Wednesday, 20 October | Thursday, 21 October

Friday, 22 October | Monday, 25 October

Tuesday, 26 October | Wednesday, 27 October

Thursday, 28 October
| Friday, 29 October

COP10: Because we can't simply photocopy the planet's biodiversity.


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The Census of Marine Life: A New Scientific Baseline for Policy

Presented by the Census of Marine Life

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L-R: Pat Halpin, Duke University, US; Edward Vanden Berghe, UNESCO-Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission; Yoshihisa Shirayama, Kyoto University; and Patricia Miloslavich, University of Simón Bolívar.

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This event summarized the research results of the 2000-2010 Census of Marine Life, a research programme that utilized a global network of researchers to establish a baseline of the diversity, distribution and abundance of marine life in oceans, past, present and future.

Yoshihisa Shirayama, Kyoto University, explained that the Census involved more than 2,700 scientists from more than 80 countries. He said it provides open access to data that presents a global pattern of marine biodiversity, which parties to the CBD can use to prepare their national reports.

Patricia Miloslavich, University of Simón Bolívar, Venezuela, described the Census’ key outputs, including: identification of marine biodiversity hotspots; development of monitoring techniques; identification of Ecologically or Biologically Significant Areas (EBSAs); and recognition that there remains great potential for discovery.

Explaining that the data collected by the Census are available in the Ocean Biogeographic Information System (OBIS), Edward Vanden Berghe, UNESCO-Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission, said the database contains 874 datasets, nearly 30 million observations, and 1,200 formal descriptions of the more than 6,000 potentially new species that the Census found. He highlighted that OBIS: is a framework for data sharing; facilitates data discovery and exploration; actively mobilizes difficult-to-access data; and enables data capture for re-use.

Pat Halpin, Duke University, described how data from the Census can aid the application of CBD criteria for EBSAs. He said the data collected in OBIS could be particularly useful for areas beyond national jurisdiction and in assessing the feasibility of implementing the CBD’s seven criteria for selecting EBSAs in the open oceans and deep seas. He noted that the Global Ocean Biodiversity Initiative is accepting proposals for candidate EBSAs in open oceans and deep seas through their website.

Jesse Ausubel, Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, US, stated that, thanks to the Census, a comprehensive baseline of all known forms of marine life now exists. He said this baseline will enable measurement of impacts on marine biodiversity of, inter alia, pollution, habitat destruction, oil spills, invasion of alien species and climate change.

Participants discussed: how to fund future work; remaining gaps in data under the Census; and how the Census can inform on human impacts on marine biodiversity.

Pat Halpin, Duke University, US

Patricia Miloslavich, University of Simón Bolívar, Venezuela, said data collected by the Census led to the establishment of two Vulnerable Marine Ecosystems in Antarctica and the inscription of a Marine National Monument to the UNESCO World Heritage List.

Yoshihisa Shirayama, Kyoto University

 

 

 

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The Pacific Voyage: Valuing Island Biodiversity – Making Conservation Happen in the Pacific Islands Region

Presented by the Secretariat for the Pacific Environment Regional Programme Biodiversity Conservation in Tropical Forests
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L-R: David Sheppard, Director, SPREP; Toni Tipamaa, Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment, Samoa; Kay Kalim, Department of Environment and Conservation, Papua New Guinea; Julien Calas, Agence Francaise de Developpement; Eleni Rova Tokaduadua, Ministry of Local Government, Housing, Urban Development and Environment, Fiji; and Ratita Bebe, Ministry of Environment, Lands & Agriculture Development.

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David Sheppard, Director, Secretariat for the Pacific Environment Regional Programme (SPREP), noted that SPREP is the main environmental organization in the Pacific region that focuses specifically on biodiversity, which he called the “lifeblood of the Pacific people.” To move forward with saving their lifeblood, Sheppard suggested the need to: build more effective and sustainable agencies for biodiversity management; create effective links between climate change and biodiversity; develop and encourage Pacific solutions to Pacific problems by building on traditional practices; and improve links between biodiversity conservation and sustainable development by building a strong economic case.

Eleni Rova Tokaduadua, Ministry of Local Government, Housing, Urban Development and Environment, Fiji, described the Locally Managed Marine Area Network, which was established primarily to address food security. She outlined a number of successes that resulted from the Network’s creation, including that species not seen in generations are returning and that there has been improved community organization and human wellbeing.

Ratita Bebe, Ministry of Environment, Lands and Agriculture Development, Kiribati, discussed the creation of protected areas on the Phoenix Islands and Kiritimati Island. She said the goal was to protect the islands, which are home to globally important seabird populations and vital to migratory bird routes across the Pacific.

Faleafaga Toni Tipamaà, Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment, Samoa, discussed restoration of Nu’utele and Nu’ulua, Aleipata Islands, through work to eradicate Pacific rats and control yellow crazy ants, one of the largest invasive ant species in the world.

Julien Calas, French Development Agency, discussed lessons learned from locally-managed marine areas in the South Pacific Island Region, emphasizing the need for collaboration and communication between those involved on all islands to ensure that best practices are shared. He also noted the need to provide sufficient time for the projects to develop, which is approximately 10-15 years.

Participants discussed, inter alia: the impact of using poisonous rat bait on non-target species; and climate change and environmental refugees in the Pacific islands.

Kay Kalim, Department of Environment and Conservation, Papua New Guinea

Eleni Rova Tokaduadua, Ministry of Local Government, Housing, Urban Development and Environment, Fiji, said the Locally Managed Marine Area Network was formed in 2001 and has expanded to 149 Locally Managed Marine Areas, or 59% of Fiji’s fishing grounds.

David Sheppard, Director, SPREP

 

 

Julien Calas, Agence Francaise de Developpement

Ratita Bebe, Ministry of Environment, Lands & Agriculture Development, Kiribati

Toni Tipamaa, Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment, Samoa

 

 


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Biodiversity Conservation in Tropical Forests

Presented by the International Tropical Timber Organization

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L-R: IBW Putra, Alas Kusuma, Indonesia; Jeff Sayer, James Cook University, Australia; Canecio Munoz, Sinar Mas, Indonesia; Marceil Yeater, CITES; and Gerald Steindlegger, WWF.

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This side event, moderated by Jeff Sayer, James Cook University, convened to discuss the International Tropical Timber Organization (ITTO)/IUCN Guidelines for the conservation and sustainable use of biodiversity in tropical timber forests. Participants also heard reports on the ITTO/IUCN/CBD Conference on Biodiversity Conservation in Transboundary Tropical Forests, held in Quito, Ecuador, in July 2010.

IBW Putra, Alas Kusuma, Indonesia, outlined a census of orangutans done with WWF on a plantation in west Kalimantan, Indonesia, between January and July 2010. He said outcomes of the census showed that there were 619-772 orangutans present on the forestry concession, with 12 directly observed. He noted that staff, of which 84% were local, were trained on surveying and nest analysis, but lamented that locals still undertake hunting, including of orangutans.

Canecio Munoz, Sinar Mas, Indonesia, highlighted Sinar Mas’ implementation of the ITTO/IUCN guidelines. He noted that 40% of their forestry concession within the Giam Siak Kecil-Bukit Batu Biosphere had been donated to conservation. He said wildlife corridors had been created and effort taken to retain natural refuges within the biosphere. He noted that cooperation with local communities, civil society, governments and NGOs is key in maintaining their concessions’ biodiversity.

Noting that 1.25% of global forests are industrial plantations, Gerald Steindlegger, WWF, said there is an increased call for sustainable land-use models that incorporate all types of forests and land uses. He noted work undertaken by WWF to identify better practices for plantation design and management and to promote frameworks that create significant environmental, social and economic results.

Steindlegger stated that plantations have negative impacts on biodiversity when they replace natural habitats, but that when planted on former agricultural land or highly degraded land, they can have neutral or positive impacts.

Marceil Yeater, CITES, outlined a collaborative project with ITTO that assists range states in Latin America, Africa and Asia in the sustainable harvest and use of CITES-listed tropical timber species. She noted that ITTO also assists CITES in providing guidance when proposals are made for the listing of a species.

Hwan Ok Ma, ITTO, noted that the Conference on Biodiversity Conservation in Transboundary Tropical Forests was organized to review socioeconomic, environmental and political impacts of transboundary conservation initiatives, identify best strategies and opportunities for increasing funding as well as to raise the profile of transboundary conservation areas (TBCAs).

On the outcomes of the conference, Tarsicio Granizo, Ministry of National Heritage, Ecuador, highlighted the mobilization of more financial resources for TBCAs and the importance of involving local communities for managing TBCAs. He also stressed the importance of: certification of goods and services from TBCAs; certificates of origin; and South-South collaboration.

In closing, Takeshi Goto, Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries, Japan, encouraged the successful use and implementation of the ITTO/IUCN Guidelines.

Marceil Yeater, CITES

Canecio Munoz, Sinar Mas, Indonesia

IBW Putra, Alas Kusuma, Indonesia, noted next steps on the Alas Kusuma-WWF Orangutan Census include developing an orangutan management and monitoring plan and undertaking a study of the relationship between staff and orangutans.

 

 

Jeff Sayer, James Cook University

Gerald Steindlegger, WWF

 

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Third Linnaeus Lecture

Presented by the CBD
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The Linnaeus Lecture Series was started by the CBD Secretariat in 2007 to mark the tricentennial of the birth of Carl Linnaeus, the Swedish scientist who is largely considered the father of modern taxonomy. This event was the third Linnaeus Lecture. Tommy Koh, Ambassador-at-Large, Singapore’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs, gave the official lecture.

Highlighting that Linnaeus described many Japanese plants and gave them scientific names, Ahmed Djoghlaf, CBD Executive Secretary, noted the appropriateness of honoring this scientist at COP10 in Nagoya.

Peter Egardt, Governor of Uppsala, Sweden, recalled the celebrations undertaken worldwide in 2007 for the 300-year anniversary of Linnaeus’ birth. He explained that, following these celebrations, the Swedish National Heritage Board decided to nominate “The Rise of Systematic Biology,” a compilation of thirteen sites in eight countries that represent the foundation of the science of systematic biology, as a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

Egardt said that while the site is a historic nomination, Sweden intends to stay at the forefront of the science of taxonomy. He described work undertaken by the Swedish Taxonomy Initiative, which seeks to identify all of Sweden’s multicellular species. He expressed hope that the project would inspire other countries to survey their own national biodiversity.

Tommy Koh said the three most important environmental challenges of our time are climate change, biodiversity loss and desertification. Lamenting that climate change receives a disproportionate amount of attention, he supported Japan’s proposal to designate a UN Decade of Biodiversity, and suggested that the UN General Assembly undertake a midterm review in 2015 of progress towards achieving a 2020 biodiversity target.

Turning his attention to urbanization, Koh said that though inevitable, the process should be viewed as a tremendous opportunity to reduce biodiversity loss rather than as a major threat to biodiversity. Koh provided examples from Singapore and said he hoped parties at COP10 would adopt the Singapore Index on Cities’ Biodiversity.

Peter Egardt, Governor of Uppsala, Sweden

Tommy Koh, Ambassador-at-Large, Singapore’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs, said the dependence of human health on the health of other species and the healthy operation of our ecosystems provides the most compelling reason to prevent biodiversity loss.

More Information:
http://www.svenskaartprojektet.se
http://www.nationalnyckeln.se/english/about.asp
http://www.artportalen.se/default.asp
http://www.artdata.slu.se/english

 

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Intellectual Property and Biodiversity in the WIPO IGC:
Identifying Links Between the CBD and WIPO

Presented by the World Intellectual Property Organization
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This event convened to outline the activities of the Intergovernmental Committee on Intellectual Property and Genetic Resources, Traditional Knowledge and Folklore (IGC) and discuss the interlinkages between the IGC and CBD's work on access and benefit sharing, traditional knowledge and genetic resources.

Begoña Venero, World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO), noted that WIPO had embarked on fact-finding missions from 1998-1999 to investigate concepts of traditional knowledge under the then intellectual property (IP) systems. She highlighted that, at the time, the IP systems could not respond to all elements of traditional knowledge but that they were ultimately evolutionary enough to provide effective protection of traditional knowledge.

In response to this, she highlighted that the WIPO General Assembly created the IGC in 2000 to discuss access to genetic resources, benefit-sharing and protection of traditional knowledge. She noted that the IGC is currently undertaking text-based negotiations to reach an agreement in 2011 on international legal instruments to ensure the effective protection of traditional knowledge, traditional cultural expressions and genetic resources.

Stressing the need for agreement on issues of terminology and policy objectives in negotiations, Martin Girsberger, Swiss Federal Institute of Intellectual Property, noted that while the CBD may be competent in dealing with access and benefit sharing issues, it does not have the competencies to deal with issues related to IP, which should be left to WIPO. He noted that a coherent system of approaches is needed to achieve mutually supportive instruments.

In the ensuing discussion, participants highlighted the lack of coherence between CBD and WIPO, with one noting that WIPO has held more discussions on traditional knowledge, genetic resources and IP issues than the CBD has. Another participant noted that WIPO’s “traditional culture” of applying terms such as “innovation” and “commercial applicability” to patent applications is difficult to apply to genetic resources and traditional knowledge as these are “age-old issues,” but that they still need protection of some form.

Begoña Venero, WIPO

Martin Girsberger, Swiss Federal Institute of Intellectual Property

Related Links
CBD resources
*CBD website
*CBD COP 10 side event website
*CBD COP 10 website

IISD RS resources
*IISD RS coverage of CBD COP 9, 19-30 May 2008, Bonn, Germany
*IISD RS coverage of Selected Side Events at CBD COP 9, 19-30 May 2008, Bonn, Germany
*IISD RS coverage of CBD COP 8, 20-31 March 2006, Curitiba, Brazil
*IISD RS coverage of Selected Side Events at CBD COP 8, 20-31 March 2006, Curitiba, Brazil
*IISD RS biodiversity and wildlife page
*Biodiversity-L - A mailing list for news on biodiversity and wildlife policy
*SIDS Policy and Practice - A Knowledgebase on the Sustainable Development of Small Island Developing States
*Linkages Update - Bi-weekly international environment and sustainable development news
*MEA Bulletin - Newsletter on key MEAs and their secretariats
*Climate-L.org - News and information on the actions of international organizations in responding to the problem of global climate change
*African Regional Coverage
*Latin America and Caribbean Regional Coverage
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